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[Not Switzerland] My overview/tips for the Black Forest (Schwarzwald) in Germany.

Schwarz – Black, and Wald – Forest. Simple.
The official tourist website is very extensive - https://www.blackforest-tourism.com/ as is - https://www.black-forest-travel.com/ . Each end also has it’s own regional tourism website: the northern Black Forest National Park (Nationalpark Schwarzwald), and the southern High Black Forest (Hochschwarzwald). Those should cover just about everything you could want.
The Black Forest is a roughly 60% forested mountain/hill range in south western Germany stretching down from Karlsruhe to the Swiss border. It never gets THAT high: at 1493m Feldberg is only just above the local tree-line. Generally speaking the northern part tends to be more touristy, and the southern end is the higher (and can offer some good Alpine views in the right weather conditions). What the actual area covered by it can be hard to define; some definitions go all the way down to the Rhein, others stop with the trees.
Something about it seems to give people romanticised ideas (and many others sell it hard on that), making it sound like a magical location (indeed many people seem to – falsely - think that all the Grimm’s fairy tales originate from here). Maybe just the name itself does that. I certainly had such feelings that it was an exotic and exciting place when I went there the first time. However having been back many times I would say it is not a truly unique place (you can find comparable landscapes all over Germany and central Europe) and it isn’t any more dark or sinister than any other forest. but is still very nice and you do get scenes like this painting. I think it works better if you think of it as an outdoor activity area for those from northern/central Europe, rather than as a must-see for someone coming from the USA or Australia.
Mark Twain wrote about it in “A Tramp Abroad”, which is free to read but that bit is much weaker than his accounts of Switzerland. Including the quote about the spas "Here . . . you lose track of time in ten minutes and the world in twenty" which is used by apparently everybody who writes about the area.
Just to ruin a few magical things…..
Getting around
Realistically you need a car to explore the area properly. You can still see some parts easily enough without a car, but you will be a little limited and much slower (figure 2x the travel time).
What to do
Outdoor activities are pretty much the main reason to go. The winters are getting increasingly less snowy. So the area is starting to focus more on hiking and biking that can increasingly be done year round.
hiking
There are well marked paths everywhere covering everything from short and easy to multi-day long distance routes. Sign posts give you destinations, and the distance to get there in km (as opposed to the time estimate in Switzerland).
A quick google of the area you plan to be in should bring up plenty of ideas.
Eg:
https://www.komoot.com/guide/37/hiking-in-the-black-forest
https://www.outdooractive.com/en/hikes/loerrach/hiking-in-loerrach/1453476/
https://monkeysandmountains.com/tips-for-hiking-in-the-black-forest-germany/
Biking
There are a mix of local loops and long distance routes.
  • The white and green routes that are well signposted do a good job of keeping you away from traffic: either on quieter backroads, or on gravel roads through the forest. In places where you have to follow a major road there will at least be a safe side path.
  • The yellow signs are the mountain bike cross routes. This is distance and height gain on gravel-paths rather than single trails and technical downhills. I plan to do the Schwarzwald-cross route at some point in the future, though maybe cutting the length of some of the harder sectons….
  • Ebikes are becoming very popular. In more touristy spots you might see more groups on ebikes than hikers.
  • There are a number of dedicated mountainbike parks. EG: https://bikepark-todtnau.de/
  • There are vast amounts of double or single trail paths that go through the forest which you can use. Often the marked footpaths follow gravel-roads rather than single trail, so it is easy to follow them. But this can be a little hit and miss with making the distances and climbs longer and harder.
Winter sports
When there is enough snow there are lots of cross-country skiing options. Downhill skiing is mostly bunny slopes, though some areas like around the Feldberg are more extensive. However the snow in recent years has been so poor that you are more likely to need a mountain bike than a pair of skis.
View points
Too many to list.
Castles and ruins
There are not many castles in the Black Forest, mostly you will find the odd ruin.
  • Erberstein
  • Schloss Hohenbaden. A ruin.
  • You have some impressive castles and fortresses in the region. Like Hohenzollern Castle, Lichtenstein Castle, Heidelberg, Neuf-Brisach, Château du Haut-Kœnigsbourg. But these are very much not in the Black Forest.
  • Klosterruine Hirsau.
Where to go
I have mapped out the places listed below.
In general if you pick a random point you will probably find something nice around it.
In December many of these places have Christmas Markets, especially Freiburg.
Main tourist spots
Triberg, Titisee, Feldberg, and Baden-Baden are arguably the biggest tourist focal points inside the Black Forest. Anywhere within a short hop of the bigger urban areas like Freiburg will also likely be quite busy on nice days.
  • Freiburg (im Breisgau). Not really Black Forest (depending on who you ask), but a nice city and a good entry point.
  • Titisee (yes that is Titi-lake). REALLY TOURISTY. The historical home of tourism in the area, also home to a slightly comical number of boats.
  • Feldberg. The highest point in the Black Forest. See also the Feldsee just below it.
  • Schluchsee. A slightly quieter lake than the Titisee. It is a dammed lake so the changing water level leaves the sides a bit barren, and the north side is dominated by a busy road that gives you the roar of motorbikes anywhere in the area. By far the nicest part of the lake is the restaurant/café at Unterkrummenhof-Schluchsee.
  • Rothaus Braueri. The makers of the beer that dominates much of the region. They have a barestaurant/shop/exhibition/hotel at their brewing site.
  • Mummelsee.
  • Baden Baden. The classic spa/casino town. Like Freiburg it isn’t really the Black Forest, but makes a good starting point.
  • Triberg. REALLY TOURSITY. See also the local waterfall which is apparently the highest in Germany.
  • There are quite a few Rödelbahn (alpine coasters).
  • Altensteig.
  • Baiersbronn. A higher end resort town with lots of fancy restaurants.
  • Open air museum Vogstbauernhof
  • Allerheiligen. Featuring a pretty waterfall and a ruined monastery.
  • Staufen
  • Wolfach.
  • Hexenlochmühle (witch hole mill)
  • The Kinzig valley, including Gengenbach and Schiltach.
  • Schloss Hohenbaden.
  • Hausach.
  • Bad Wildbad.
  • Gutachtal.
  • Ravennaschluct and the Christmas Market there.
  • Donauquelle (source of the Danube river).
Other spots
These might also be touristy to some extent, but probably far less so.
  • Wutachschlucht.
  • Sankt Blasien (a surrealy big church in a small valley).
  • Kloster St. Peter auf dem Schwarzwald.
  • Geroldsau Waterfall.
  • Zweribach Waterfall.
  • Freudenstadt.
  • Alpirsbach.
  • Bernau.
  • Menzenschwand.
  • Herzogenhorn.
  • Calw.
  • Nagold.
  • Schitach.
  • Hornisgrinde.
  • Alternativer Wolf- und Bärenpark
Food and drink
Separating truly Black Forest and anything from that region is a little hard. Being a rural area there are plenty of local jams/honey/etc on sale
  • Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte (Black Forest gâteau/cake). Quite why it got the name is unclear and there are various stories, it might be the flavouring with Kirsch (hence the name in German). The origin of the cake itself is also seemingly uncertain, with there being no absolute proof that it originated in the Black Forest. More likely it seems to have come from Bonn. You can certainly find it easily and enjoy it in the Black Forest though.
  • Schwarzwälder schinken (Black Forest Ham). A smoke-cured raw ham. In Europe this has regional protection, so it has to be produced in the region to a certain standard to have the name. The name seems to resonate strongly with people from the USA - where it is not under any protection and seems to be a common exotic sounding description slapped on the name of any old pork product (this can vary from something respectable looking, to a level of “DEAR GOD WHAT THE IN NAME OF FUCK IS THAT”). Whatever it is that Subway sells has certainly never been anywhere near the Black Forest. There is apparently a museum about the meat in Musbach bei Freudenstadt, and certainly one at the Feldberg. There is even a ham themed hiking route.
  • Beer. Rothaus is the most common beer in the area, and can increasingly be found further and further away. Waldhaus is a favourite of mine, and there are numerous others. Again the tourism website is quite informative (though not all inclusive).
  • Other Alcohol. The cherry brandy Kirsch(wasser) is the most famous and traditional. There are various other fruit based Schnapps. There are also more modern drinks like Whiskey such as the Marder Whiskey or Black Forest (from Rothaus) and gin such as the Monkey 47 (to name just a few).
  • Wine is made in the area – especially in the Rhein valley around Freiburg.
Other bits
There are endless little museums.
  • Cuckoo clocks (Kuckucksuhr). That other Black Forest thing. They might not have originated in the Black Forest, but they became very popular there. There is a museum, and Triberg and Schonach both claim to have the world's largest cuckoo clock, among other clock based touristy-things scattered around. You will never be short of the chance to buy one.
  • Glassmaking is an old tradition and there are workshops and show-rooms all over the area. There should also be a glass making themed hike in the south somewhere.
  • For a rather unique spot read this article and then visit the Engländerdenkmal.
Articles and other resources
Reading/culture
Other points
  • For similar areas the Swiss Jura mountains are very close. Likewise the Emmental (especially around Napf) and Appenzell. The latter have the advantage that in addition to deeply folded wooded valleys, the landscape then rises up to the Alps.
  • There have been a few suspected wolf sightings but nothing to worry you – motorbikes present a far bigger danger.
  • A far realer danger than wolfs is hunters during the autumn – it is best not to go off of the paths then. You will see their high perches all over the Black Forest and Germany.
  • I don’t care how much I have been inconsistent with the ordering of English (German) and German (English).
submitted by travel_ali to ali_on_switzerland [link] [comments]

My overview/tips for the Black Forest (Schwarzwald) in Germany.

Schwarz – Black, and Wald – Forest. Simple. Though the real origin of the name seems unclear. There are various myths but non seem to be true for certain.
The official tourist website is very extensive - https://www.blackforest-tourism.com/ as is - https://www.black-forest-travel.com/ . Each end also has it’s own regional tourism website: the northern Black Forest National Park (Nationalpark Schwarzwald), and the southern High Black Forest (Hochschwarzwald). Those should cover just about everything you could want.
The Black Forest is a roughly 60% forested mountain/hill range in south western Germany stretching down from Karlsruhe to the Swiss border. It never gets THAT high: at 1493m Feldberg is only just above the local tree-line. Generally speaking the northern part tends to be more touristy, and the southern end is the higher (and can offer some good Alpine views in the right weather conditions). What the actual area covered by it can be hard to define; some definitions go all the way down to the Rhein, others stop with the trees.
Something about it seems to give people romanticised ideas (and many others sell it hard on that), making it sound like a magical location (indeed many people seem to – falsely - think that all the Grimm’s fairy tales originate from here). Maybe just the name itself does that. I certainly had such feelings that it was an exotic and exciting place when I went there the first time. Having been back many times I would say it is not a truly unique place (you can find comparable landscapes all over central Europe) and it isn’t any more dark or sinister than any other forest. but is still very very nice and you do get scenes like this painting. I also think it works better as an outdoor activity area for those from northern/central Europe, rather than as a must-see for someone coming from the USA or Australia and who only has a short time to work with.
Mark Twain wrote about it in “A Tramp Abroad”, which is free to read but that bit is much weaker than his accounts of Switzerland. Including the quote about the spas "Here . . . you lose track of time in ten minutes and the world in twenty" which is used by apparently everybody who writes about the area.
Just to ruin a few magical things…..
Getting around
Realistically you need a car to explore the area properly. You can still see some parts easily enough without a car, but you will be a little limited and much slower (figure 2x the travel time).
Sports
Outdoor activities are pretty much the main reason to go. The winters are getting increasingly less snowy. So the area is starting to focus more on hiking and biking that can increasingly be done year round.
hiking
There are well marked paths everywhere covering everything from short and easy to multi-day long distance routes. A quick google of the area you plan to be in should bring up plenty of ideas. Eg:
https://www.komoot.com/guide/37/hiking-in-the-black-forest
https://www.outdooractive.com/en/hikes/loerrach/hiking-in-loerrach/1453476/
https://monkeysandmountains.com/tips-for-hiking-in-the-black-forest-germany/
Biking
Likewise there are lots of biking routes of various types that are covered by the tourist websites.
I plan to do the Schwarzwald-cross route at some point in the future. Though maybe cutting the length of some of the harder sectons….
Snow
When there is enough snow there are lots of cross-country skiing options. Downhill skiing is mostly bunny slopes, though some areas like around the Feldberg are more extensive. However the snow in recent years has been so poor that your are more likely to need a mountain bike than a pair of skis.
Where to go
I have mapped out the places listed below.
In general if you pick a random point you will probably find something nice around it.
In December many of these places have Christmas Markets, especially Freiburg.
Main tourist spots
Triberg and Titisee are arguably the two biggest tourist focal points inside the Black Forest. Anywhere within a short hop of the bigger urban areas like Freiburg will also likely be quite busy on nice days.
  • Freiburg (im Breisgau). Not really Black Forest (depending on who you ask), but a nice city and a good entry point.
  • Titisee (yes that is Titi-lake). REALLY TOURISTY. The historical home of tourism in the area, also home to a slightly comical number of boats.
  • Feldberg. See also the Feldsee just below it.
  • Schluchsee. A slightly quieter lake than the Titisee.
  • Mummelsee.
  • Baden Baden. The classic spa/casino town. Like Freiburg it isn’t really the Black Forest, but makes a good starting point.
  • Triberg. REALLY TOURSITY. See also the local waterfall which is apparently the highest in Germany.
  • There are quite a few Rödelbahn (alpine coasters).
  • Altensteig.
  • Baiersbronn. A higher end resort town with lots of fancy restaurants.
  • Open air museum Vogstbauernhof
  • Allerheiligen. Featuring a pretty waterfall and a ruined monastery.
  • Staufen
  • Wolfach.
  • Hexenlochmühle (witch hole mill)
  • The Kinzig valley, including Gengenbach and Schiltach
  • Schloss Hohenbaden
  • Hausach.
  • Bad Wildbad
  • Gutachtal
  • Ravennaschluct and the Christmas Market there
  • Donauquelle (source of the Danube river).
Other spots
These might also be touristy to some extent, but probably far less so.
  • Wutachschlucht
  • Sankt Blasien (the big church)
  • Kloster St. Peter auf dem Schwarzwald.
  • Geroldsau Waterfall
  • Zweribach Waterfall
  • Freudenstadt
  • Alpirsbach
  • Bernau
  • Menzenschwand.
  • Herzogenhorn.
  • Calw
  • Nagold
  • Schitach
  • Hornisgrinde
  • Alternativer Wolf- und Bärenpark
Food and drink
Separating truly Black Forest and anything from that region is a little hard. Being a rural area there are plenty of local jams/honey/etc on sale
  • Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte (Black Forest gâteau/cake). Quite why it got the name is unclear and there are various stories, it might be the flavouring with Kirsch (hence the name in German). The origin of the cake itself is also seemingly uncertain, with there being no absolute proof that it originated in the Black Forest. More likely it seems to have come from Bonn. You can certainly find it easily and enjoy it in the Black Forest though.
  • Schwarzwälder schinken (Black Forest Ham). A smoke-cured raw ham. In Europe this has regional protection, so it has to be produced in the region to a certain standard to have the name. The name seems to resonate strongly with people from the USA - where it is not under any protection and seems to be a common exotic sounding description slapped on the name of any old pork product (this can vary from something respectable looking, to a level of “DEAR GOD WHAT THE IN NAME OF FUCK IS THAT”). Whatever it is that Subway sells has certainly never been anywhere near the Black Forest. There is apparently a museum about the meat in Musbach bei Freudenstadt, and certainly one at the Feldberg. There is even a ham themed hiking route.
  • Beer. Rothaus is the most common beer in the area, and can increasingly be found further and further away. Waldhaus is a favourite of mine, and there are numerous others. Again the tourism website is quite informative (though not all inclusive).
  • Wine is made in the area – especially in the Rhein valley around Freiburg.
  • Other Alcohol. The cherry brandy Kirsch(wasser) is the most famous. There are various other fruit based Schnapps. There are also Whiskey and gin producers (to name just a few).
Other bits
There are endless little museums.
  • Cuckoo clocks (Kuckucksuhr). That other Black Forest thing. They might not have originated in the Black Forest, but they became very popular there. There is a museum, and Triberg and Schonach both claim to have the world's largest cuckoo clock, among other clock based touristy-things scattered around. You will never be short of the chance to buy one.
  • Glassmaking is an old tradition and there are workshops and show-rooms all over the area. There should also be a glass making themed hike in the south somewhere.
  • For a rather unique spot read this article and then visit the Engländerdenkmal.
Other points
submitted by travel_ali to travel [link] [comments]

My overview/tips for the Black Forest (Schwarzwald) in Germany.

Schwarz – Black, and Wald – Forest. Simple. Though the real origin of the name seems unclear. There are various myths but non seem to be true for certain.
The official tourist website is very extensive - https://www.blackforest-tourism.com/ as is - https://www.black-forest-travel.com/ . Each end also has it’s own regional tourism website: the northern Black Forest National Park (Nationalpark Schwarzwald), and the southern High Black Forest (Hochschwarzwald). Those should cover just about everything you could want.
The Black Forest is a roughly 60% forested mountain/hill range in south western Germany stretching down from Karlsruhe to the Swiss border. It never gets THAT high: at 1493m Feldberg is only just above the local tree-line. Generally speaking the northern part tends to be more touristy, and the southern end is the higher (and can offer some good Alpine views in the right weather conditions). What the actual area covered by it can be hard to define; some definitions go all the way down to the Rhein, others stop with the trees.
Something about it seems to give people romanticised ideas (and many others sell it hard on that), making it sound like a magical location (indeed many people seem to – falsely - think that all the Grimm’s fairy tales originate from here). Maybe just the name itself does that. I certainly had such feelings that it was an exotic and exciting place when I went there the first time. Having been back many times I would say it is not a truly unique place (you can find comparable landscapes all over central Europe) and it isn’t any more dark or sinister than any other forest. but is still very very nice and you do get scenes like this painting. I also think it works better as an outdoor activity area for those from northern/central Europe, rather than as a must-see for someone coming from the USA or Australia and who only has a short time to work with.
Mark Twain wrote about it in “A Tramp Abroad”, which is free to read but that bit is much weaker than his accounts of Switzerland. Including the quote about the spas "Here . . . you lose track of time in ten minutes and the world in twenty" which is used by apparently everybody who writes about the area.
Just to ruin a few magical things…..
Getting around
Realistically you need a car to explore the area properly. You can still see some parts easily enough without a car, but you will be a little limited and much slower (figure 2x the travel time).
Sports
Outdoor activities are pretty much the main reason to go. The winters are getting increasingly less snowy. So the area is starting to focus more on hiking and biking that can increasingly be done year round.
hiking
There are well marked paths everywhere covering everything from short and easy to multi-day long distance routes. A quick google of the area you plan to be in should bring up plenty of ideas. Eg:
https://www.komoot.com/guide/37/hiking-in-the-black-forest
https://www.outdooractive.com/en/hikes/loerrach/hiking-in-loerrach/1453476/
https://monkeysandmountains.com/tips-for-hiking-in-the-black-forest-germany/
Biking
Likewise there are lots of biking routes of various types that are covered by the tourist websites.
I plan to do the Schwarzwald-cross route at some point in the future. Though maybe cutting the length of some of the harder sectons….
Snow
When there is enough snow there are lots of cross-country skiing options. Downhill skiing is mostly bunny slopes, though some areas like around the Feldberg are more extensive. However the snow in recent years has been so poor that your are more likely to need a mountain bike than a pair of skis.
Where to go
I have mapped out the places listed below.
In general if you pick a random point you will probably find something nice around it.
In December many of these places have Christmas Markets, especially Freiburg.
Main tourist spots
Triberg and Titisee are arguably the two biggest tourist focal points inside the Black Forest. Anywhere within a short hop of the bigger urban areas like Freiburg will also likely be quite busy on nice days.
  • Freiburg (im Breisgau). Not really Black Forest (depending on who you ask), but a nice city and a good entry point.
  • Titisee (yes that is Titi-lake). REALLY TOURISTY. The historical home of tourism in the area, also home to a slightly comical number of boats.
  • Feldberg. See also the Feldsee just below it.
  • Schluchsee. A slightly quieter lake than the Titisee.
  • Mummelsee.
  • Baden Baden. The classic spa/casino town. Like Freiburg it isn’t really the Black Forest, but makes a good starting point.
  • Triberg. REALLY TOURSITY. See also the local waterfall which is apparently the highest in Germany.
  • There are quite a few Rödelbahn (alpine coasters).
  • Altensteig.
  • Baiersbronn. A higher end resort town with lots of fancy restaurants.
  • Open air museum Vogstbauernhof
  • Allerheiligen. Featuring a pretty waterfall and a ruined monastery.
  • Staufen
  • Wolfach.
  • Hexenlochmühle (witch hole mill)
  • The Kinzig valley, including Gengenbach and Schiltach
  • Schloss Hohenbaden
  • Hausach.
  • Bad Wildbad
  • Gutachtal
  • Ravennaschluct and the Christmas Market there
  • Donauquelle (source of the Danube river).
Other spots
These might also be touristy to some extent, but probably far less so.
  • Wutachschlucht
  • Sankt Blasien (the big church)
  • Kloster St. Peter auf dem Schwarzwald.
  • Geroldsau Waterfall
  • Zweribach Waterfall
  • Freudenstadt
  • Alpirsbach
  • Bernau
  • Menzenschwand.
  • Herzogenhorn.
  • Calw
  • Nagold
  • Schitach
  • Hornisgrinde
  • Alternativer Wolf- und Bärenpark
Food and drink
Separating truly Black Forest and anything from that region is a little hard. Being a rural area there are plenty of local jams/honey/etc on sale
  • Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte (Black Forest gâteau/cake). Quite why it got the name is unclear and there are various stories, it might be the flavouring with Kirsch (hence the name in German). The origin of the cake itself is also seemingly uncertain, with there being no absolute proof that it originated in the Black Forest. More likely it seems to have come from Bonn. You can certainly find it easily and enjoy it in the Black Forest though.
  • Schwarzwälder schinken (Black Forest Ham). A smoke-cured raw ham. In Europe this has regional protection, so it has to be produced in the region to a certain standard to have the name. The name seems to resonate strongly with people from the USA - where it is not under any protection and seems to be a common exotic sounding description slapped on the name of any old pork product (this can vary from something respectable looking, to a level of “DEAR GOD WHAT THE IN NAME OF FUCK IS THAT”). Whatever it is that Subway sells has certainly never been anywhere near the Black Forest. There is apparently a museum about the meat in Musbach bei Freudenstadt, and certainly one at the Feldberg. There is even a ham themed hiking route.
  • Beer. Rothaus is the most common beer in the area, and can increasingly be found further and further away. Waldhaus is a favourite of mine, and there are numerous others. Again the tourism website is quite informative (though not all inclusive).
  • Wine is made in the area – especially in the Rhein valley around Freiburg.
  • Other Alcohol. The cherry brandy Kirsch(wasser) is the most famous. There are various other fruit based Schnapps. There are also Whiskey and gin producers (to name just a few).
Other bits
There are endless little museums.
  • Cuckoo clocks (Kuckucksuhr). That other Black Forest thing. They might not have originated in the Black Forest, but they became very popular there. There is a museum, and Triberg and Schonach both claim to have the world's largest cuckoo clock, among other clock based touristy-things scattered around. You will never be short of the chance to buy one.
  • Glassmaking is an old tradition and there are workshops and show-rooms all over the area. There should also be a glass making themed hike in the south somewhere.
  • For a rather unique spot read this article and then visit the Engländerdenkmal.
Other points
submitted by travel_ali to TravelNoPics [link] [comments]

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