Conrad Cairo Hotel & Casino 5* | WEBSITE | Cairo | Egypt

literally just real life in a video game

INTRO I obviously this is way too big of a project for most devs here, let alone myself. however, i've had the idea for a while and just wanted someone to know about it.
INTRO II the first thing that turned myself off about my own idea was MMO in the steam tags. i'd imagined a first person, basic graphics, life simulator with rapid aging and permadeath. this would pretty much only work if the game was popular right off the bat, though, because of a birth and death mechanic.
BASICS when you first spawn (or are "born") you live in a completely random area of a completely fictional world. you could live in a huge city, a tribal, barbaric island, the suburbs, a small village, anything. what's more, your character would have stats and attributes that can only be changed via certain activities. (i.e. if you were to be born into a starving village, your health attributes would be low, or if you were born a prodigy, your intellect would be high)
IN-DEPTH of course, all of these things can be changed with varying difficulty based on where you would be born. if you were born into a utopia and were unhealthy, it would be easier for a doctor to treat you. as implied before, many attributes are based almost entirely on where you live, or what job/hobbies you take up.
JUNK YOU CAN DO FOR A LIVING jobs, schooling, and hobbies are all optional parts of the game, but schooling is determined by where you live and your parents, who would ideally be other players. more on the family system later.
COUNTRIES AND AREAS if someone were born into a first-world country, like america or germany, schooling would be higher quality, job opportunities would be set according to the area in which you live, and hobbies would be more manufactured than crafted. if you were to be born into a third-world country, like togo or kazakhstan, schooling would provide less intellect, job choices would be limited, and hobbies would mostly be something that could be done for next to free. (i.e. soccefootball, weaving, etc.)
EXCEPTIONS of course, some areas in third-world countries are higher-end, like cairo in egypt, as well as poorer areas in first-world countries, like inner-city chicago. jobs in these areas, though, are likely to be vastly different.
COLD HARD CASH in terms of money, it can be gained from working, inheritance, or other players. the biggest mechanics, obviously, would be inheritance and other players. more on inheritance in the family section. with money given by other players, a player could employ other real players to work for them, rather than working for the NPCs. it could also encourage illegal activities, like hiring a hitman or even money laundering. this would be an allowed mechanic, but the NPCs of the government and police department, as well as players working for them, can arrest you with sufficient proof of a crime. that brings me to the legal system.
LEGAL SYSTEM in order to make the game more entertaining than real life, the legal system would be very basic, with only a few uses. one, to arrest both NPC and player criminals. two, to sue another player via an NPC law firm. three, to collect taxes relative to where you live. four, to employ players at an NPC law firm to defend other NPCs. and five, suing an NPC or NPC run business. pretty basic, and in places like outer islands or tiny villages, it would simply be a jury of villagers to convict you, considering you aren't killed on sight of a crime. that brings me to the life/death system.
LIFE/DEATH SYSTEM a at birth, you either spawn with NPC parents or at an orphanage. life goes quickly, so as to provide many experiences for the player. the entirety of childhood and schooling to high school would theoretically take about 50-60 minutes at most, giving around three minutes per year. this would be in an entirely different area than the adult years of the game, though it could be played with an online party of up to 4 through the whole schooling process. then, once schooling is done, you have the choice to join a public online server (which is what most of the player mechanics i suggested would be used for) or a private online or offline session.
LIFE/DEATH SYSTEM Ia online/offline private sessions are mostly run by NPCs. if played online, four players can participate in a private session, similar to schooling. however, only one player can be on an offline session. pretty simple. online public servers are almost always up, and progress is saved in a cloud drive for that particular server. (like rust) for offline/private, the files would be local so the server can only be accessed by the host pc when offline.
LIFE/DEATH SYSTEM Ib once schooling is over, the player is transported to a completely open world area where the adult portion of the game begins. here, every year is one hour. despite this, only two days pass in the hour relative to each year. a day is 15 minutes, and a night is 15 minutes. birthdays are set by the minute. for example, if the year in the newly joined online server was 19 minutes in from the beginning of the year, your birthday would simply be "19." every hour, on the 19th minute, you would age one year. depending on your health, the average life would last around 80 years. in certain circumstances, though, you could die at 20 or even live to be 110 or older.
LIFE/DEATH SYSTEM Ic typically, the open world is available as soon as you either drop out of school or graduate, but in some circumstances you can be held back in school, extending the time by another 3 minutes. another idea for schooling would just be a one-time tutorial before you can freely enter the primary world at 18.
LIFE/DEATH SYSTEM II of course, playing the same life for 80-120 hours would get stale somewhat quickly. because of this, time would pass even when you aren't on the game. considering it takes you 30 hours to get back on the game after leaving at age 19, you would return at age 49. depending on your job, you will also receive a salary for every year you were gone. you will also spawn back in exactly where you left, so i wouldn't recommend leaving the game on a crosswalk.
LIFE/DEATH SYSTEM III another feature would be a bloodline. either with an NPC or player of the opposite gender, you can have a biological child. otherwise, you can simply adopt a child. ideally, a player's child could be taken over by a real player once the child reaches 18. this would allow for legacies that last hundreds or even thousands of years. with enough luck, a player could even be reborn as their own descendant after multiple generations.
THE LOWDOWN ON BUSINESS there are various businesses that are essential for living, as well as recreational stores. restaurants, grocery stores, colleges and the like are completely run by NPCs, but players could be hired to work as a cashier, teacher, waitewaitress, etc. recreational stores include game stores, which keeps your sanity attribute high, gun shops, which those filthy hitmen can purchase weapons from, and the like. players cannot work at these stores.
DYING, RETIREMENT, AND TRAVEL towards the end of a player's life, they can choose to take pension and retire, opening up more recreational opportunities. for example, if you have enough money, you could travel or even emigrate to another area. if you really wanted, you could do all of these ideas while you're still working. you could go to casinos, amusement parks, the movies, etc. additionally, a player can write his/her will if they have a family, choosing to distribute the money to either your children, your spouse, everyone, charity, or your family and charity.
CONCLUSION that essentially does it for my ideas right now, excluding some clearly available things like cars, planes, boats, real estate, fighting, etc. again, it's just a concept because i couldn't even begin to imagine creating this game. just thought it'd be cool to get this idea out there.
submitted by SuperSalFad to gameideas [link] [comments]

My take on fixing the Dark Universe

Much like Frankenstein's famous monster, the Dark Universe is probably doomed to be remembered as a failed experiment cobbled together from spare parts, and a cautionary tale about the perils of playing God. As Universal Pictures found out the hard way: creating a universe is really hard, even if that universe happens to be fictional.
At best, Dracula Untold and The Mummy were just a pair of bland, forgettable fantasy films with a few neat ideas thrown in. At worst, they embody the most deplorable excesses of Hollywood's love affair with franchises and reboots, and they serve as a reminder that a "cinematic universe" isn't a magic bullet that guarantees massive success.
In case you forgot: Dracula Untold bombed so hard that the studio retroactively exiled it from the franchise (and they don't even like to admit that it was ever part of a franchise), and The Mummy put the name of the franchise in its opening credits before the franchise was even established.
But was this series always doomed to failure, or was it just flawed in its execution? Call me crazy, but I think there was the kernel of a great series in both of those movies, even as disappointing as they were.
A Dracula movie set in the Middle Ages, with historical details about the real Vlad Dracula thrown in? Awesome! A Mummy movie that's also a spy thriller, where Tom Cruise plays an undead superhero? Okay, that was stupid... But that room full of classic monster Easter Eggs was pretty cool, right?
So what happened? In short: a lot of things. Dracula Untold had a promising story, but I really think its premise ran into a big problem:
Origin stories are extremely hard to do well.
They're definitely not impossible (the rules of storytelling are more like guidelines, after all), but not every character can be improved with a definitive origin story.
It's one thing to make a feature-length origin story about an iconic hero like James Bond or Batman, since they're sympathetic characters whom we're meant to identify with. For anybody who's ever daydreamed about being a superhero or a secret agent, those fantasies instantly become a lot more vivid when we see a hero's human side, and we learn how they came to be; once we see that our heroes aren't so different from us, it's easier to imagine that we could be like them.
Monsters, though? Monsters are a different story. While most great villains have a human side, they usually become iconic because they embody something primal and archetypal that we find scary, and they derive their power from their mystery.
Moviegoers of the 1960s loved Ernst Stavro Blofeld because he embodied everything that they found scary about dictators on the far side of the Iron Curtain. Comic book fans love the Joker because he's the personification of chaos, and he embodies everything that we find scary about crime. And supernatural villains like Maleficent, the Wicked Witch of the West, and—yes—Dracula embody everything that we find scary about the occult.
That's probably why most James Bond fans loved it when Casino Royale explored Bond's origins, but hated it when Spectre tried to do the same for Blofeld. It's also probably why Batman fans loved it when Batman Begins explained how Bruce Wayne became Batman, but didn't mind that The Dark Knight explained almost nothing about the Joker. And it's probably why Maleficent and Oz the Great and Powerful got such lukewarm receptions when they tried to explain how Maleficent and the Wicked Witch became evil. When you explain too much about an iconic villain, you run the risk of robbing them of their mystique.
(That's also why I'm not so optimistic about the upcoming Joker origin movie, though I'll wait until it comes out before I criticize it)
The thing is, though...a prequel doesn't necessarily have to be an origin story. It's possible to shed some light on a character's past without devoting a whole story to explaining how they became the way they are. Case in point: compare the movie Hannibal Rising to the TV series Hannibal. They're both prequels to the Hannibal Lecter saga, but one was a critically panned box-office bomb, and the other was a critically praised cult classic with a devoted fandom. Why? There are a lot of reasons why—but for starters, one was devoted to "explaining" how Lecter became Lecter, and the other actually gives Lecter a chance to be Lecter.
Instead of just answering every single question about Lecter's past, Hannibal devotes its creative energy to being a genuinely solid crime drama with a strong dose of gothic horror, and it actually manages to stand on its own alongside The Silence of the Lambs and Red Dragon without being entirely defined by either of them. In a perfect world, that's the sort of prequel that Dracula Untold should have been: a solid supernatural horror story set in the Middle Ages, which could paved the way for the original Dracula without being entirely defined by it.
But what if we actually had gotten a Dracula prequel like that? And what if we had gotten a Mummy movie that logically built on its plot points, and set up the framework of a franchise without shoving it down our throats? And what if we had gotten, say, a Frankenstein movie and a Wolf Man movie that built on both of them, and set up an epic "monster mash" in the vein of Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man or House of Dracula? What might those movies have looked like?
Well...
Dracula: Untold (2014)
Setting: Transylvania, 1473
As our movie opens, we're introduced to our protagonist: a handsome, dark-haired Prince who rules over a vast swath of territories in Eastern Europe, including Transylvania. A lifelong soldier, he's led his people to victory in dozens of battles, he always wears a suit of armor, and he can wield a sword as well as any of his loyal knights. If it helps, you can imagine imagine Luke Evans playing him.
But protagonist isn't Vlad Tepes (the man better known as "Dracula", or "Vlad the Impaler"). Instead, he's a different historical monarch: Matthias Corvinus, the King of Hungary. As any Dracula fan will tell you, Matthias Corvinus was arguably the single most important figure in the historical Dracula's life; a revered monarch who became legendary for his prowess in battle and his patronage of the arts, he was alternately an ally and rival of Prince Vlad of Wallachia, who fought alongside him against the Ottoman Empire. Here, Matthias is our hero, and Dracula is the villain of the story—as he should be.
Over the course of his three decades on the throne, Matthias has seen the world change, not always for the better. It's been twenty years since the great city of Constantinople fell to the Ottoman sultan Mehmed II, spelling the end of the last vestiges of the Roman Empire. As the sultan's power grows, the lords and princes of Christian Europe fear that the religion of Islam will soon dominate the West. While all of this plays out, rumors spread of strange creatures hiding in the shadowy lands east of the Carpathian Mountains, where the brutal prince Vlad—called "Dracula", or "Son of the Beast"—holds sway over the kingdom of Wallachia.
While Mehmed's armies grow ever closer to the borders of Matthias' kingdom, Matthias answers a call for help from the province of Transylvania, where strange and terrible things are afoot. The corpses of peasants are turning up in the woods, completely drained of their blood; entire villages are vanishing without explanation; massive swarms of bats can be seen flying over the countryside in the dead of night; hunters regularly encounter enormous wolf-like creatures, which walk on two legs like men. Matthias realizes that his kingdom is falling under the sway of evil forces, and he must confront them.
Against the advice of his men, Matthias decides to lead a party of knights across the Carpathian Mountains to investigate the rash of mysterious deaths, knowing that his journey will lead him into the heart of Wallachia. As he and his men travel farther and farther from home, they find themselves fighting for their lives against ferocious werewolves and hostile villagers, and they soon realize why so many villagers are vanishing: someone is turning them into mindless vampires, and they're leaving their homes to seek fresh blood. After one deadly confrontation with a swarm of vampires, Matthias is forced to behead one of his own knights to prevent him from becoming one of them, and a local apothecary offers him some advice on how to kill a vampire.
After explaining how to ward off vampires with stakes and crucifixes, the apothecary tells Matthias the disturbing tale of Prince Vlad, who hasn't been seen outside of his castle in months. She explains that she was once a servant in the castle, but fled for her life after she witnessed Vlad drinking blood from a chalice in a disturbing occult ritual. She believes that the Prince has become a vampire, and that he has sworn allegiance to Lucifer in exchange for eternal life. Though Matthias doubts her story about Vlad being in league with Lucifer, he knows that the vampires must have a master, and believes that it might be Vlad.
But the apothecary's warning comes too late: Matthias and his party are ambushed and captured by vampires, who take them to Prince Vlad's castle. When Matthias awakes, he finds himself in chains in Vlad's throne room, and Vlad—played by Charles Dance—formally introduces himself. He informs Matthias that he no longer answers to his old name, and is now only "Dracula". With that, Matthias is forced to watch helplessly as Dracula fatally impales his comrades on wooden stakes, and Dracula's vampire servants eagerly gather their blood in a chalice and present it to their master. As Dracula sips from his chalice, he informs Matthias that the apothecary's story was true: he really is a servant of Lucifer. And now that he has a noble-born prince as a captive, he plans to sacrifice him to Lucifer, which will grant him enough power to make him unstoppable.
While Dracula prepares the sacrifice ritual, he throws Matthias into his dungeon to await his fate. But with quick thinking and a little bit of luck, Matthias manages to escape after one of Dracula's brides disobeys her master's orders and sneaks into the dungeons to take some of Matthias' blood for herself. Heeding the apothecary's advice, he manages to fight his way through legions of vampires, and rushes back to Dracula's throne room to confront him. Just as he does, Dracula speaks the incantation to summon his master Lucifer, and Matthias finds himself staring through a fiery portal into Hell—where he sees Lucifer staring right back at him.
Just at that moment, salvation arrives: the sultan's army is on the march, and they've reached Dracula's castle. As Matthias picks up his sword and engages Dracula in battle, a barrage of cannon-fire rings out, and the Ottoman army lays siege to the castle. Little by little, the castle begins to crumble, and Dracula falls into the dungeons, where he's buried under a pile of stone rubble. As the castle's walls fall, Matthias makes his escape and sets off for home.
Days later, as Matthias lays down to sleep beside his wife, he has a disturbing dream about Dracula—who is trapped in the dungeons of his ruined castle, but very much alive. In his dream, Dracula assures him that he will rise again, and he reminds Matthias that he's immortal; the next time he threatens the people of Transylvania, Matthias may not be alive to stop him...
The Mummy: Unconquered (2016)
Setting: Egypt, 1798
Our story picks up more than 300 years after the sultan's troops destroyed Castle Dracula. The year is 1798, and the Ottoman Empire still rules over much of Eastern Europe and the Middle East—including Egypt, where the Mamluk rulers Mourad and Ibrahim swear fealty to the sultan. After decades of war and revolutionary upheaval in Europe, rumors spread of an ambitious Corsican military officer, who has risen through the ranks of the French Army to become one of the most feared men on the Continent. Now, with an unparalleled fighting force at his command, he plans to set his sights on Egypt. His name? Napoleon Bonaparte.
Our protagonist is a young Egyptian man named Salim, who reluctantly answers the call to enlist in the Egyptian Army as Napoleon's forces march from Alexandria and make their move on Cairo. He is forced to leave his fiancee, Yasmin, whose father Mustafa is a renowned scholar who manages a library in Cairo. As he fights with the Egyptian Army in the Battle of the Pyramids, he narrowly escapes with his life as the French Army massacres his friends and comrades, and takes hundreds of Egyptian prisoners. Unbeknownst to him, though, Napoleon has more than conquest on his mind; he's looking for the long-lost Temple of Set, which supposedly houses a fabled ceremonial dagger that can make its bearer unstoppable in battle. With the Egyptian forces scattered, he and his army strike out into the desert to seek out the temple. One of his commanders is a certain German baron, whose name will become important later.
Eventually, Napoleon finds his way to the temple, which is half-buried in the desert sands, and nearly inaccessible. But against all odds, he fights his way to the heart of the temple and takes the dagger, though he begins to have his doubts about whether it will really bring him the power that he seeks. As he leaves the temple, he doesn't notice that something is stirring in a stone sarcophagus...
Exhausted from battle, Salim manages to make his way back to Yasmin and her father in Cairo, just as Napoleon's forces swarm the streets. Together, they plan to flee the city before more soldiers arrive, but Mustafa refuses to go with them, insisting that he can't leave his library. Before they can make their escape, the German baron forces his way into Mustafa's library and threatens him at knife-point. He tells him that Napoleon has found the dagger in the Temple of Set, but he suspects that there is a secret to claiming its power—and he believes that he'll find that secret in one of the books in Mustafa's library. Visibly terrified, Mustafa insists that there is no such secret, but he tells the baron that he must return the dagger to the temple.
"The Dagger of Set is no key to power—it's a safeguard against a great evil. There are shadowy forces lurking in the Temple of Set, and the dagger is the only thing keeping them back! Once it's removed..."
But his warning comes too late: a monstrous horde of giant scarabs swarms the city of Cairo, attacking and devouring everyone in their path. Salim and co. manage to escape from the baron, and they take shelter in the cellar of Mustafa's library. As they hide from the rampaging insects, Mustafa explains the full story of the Temple of Set.
In his younger days, Mustafa was a scholar in the court of the sultan, and he had the opportunity to learn many secrets in his palace library. While there, he learned the story of Imhotep, an infamous high priest from the New Kingdom of Egypt who made a pact with the evil god Set in exchange for eternal life and everlasting power. It's said that the Pharaoh had Imhotep mummified alive and sealed in his own temple when he grew too powerful, and he placed the enchanted dagger in the temple to prevent him from leaving. For centuries, the Temple of Set has remained abandoned, and Imhotep has remained dormant—but he's as alive as ever, and only needs an opportunity to free himself. To seal him back in his prison, the dagger must be returned to its rightful place in the temple
"Over 300 years ago, the sultan's army laid siege to a castle in the Carpathian Mountains. Something evil dwelt in its foundations, and they dared not set it free. There are places in the world where evil gathers like a deadly plague, awaiting the chance to spread. That castle was one such place. The Temple of Set is another."
Back in the Temple of Set, Imhotep—a grotesque, withered figure wrapped in bandages—rises from his sarcophagus and summons a massive army of reanimated corpses. As Imhotep and his army march on Cairo together, the scarabs continue to swarm the city, and Salim and Yasmin fight to survive as they look for the missing dagger. When Napoleon's forces spot the army of corpses marching through the desert, they gather in formation to fight them off, and Salim takes the opportunity to steal the dagger from Napoleon's camp. In a massive battle, Napoleon and the baron lead a cavalry charge against Imhotep's forces, distracting them just long enough for Salim and Yasmin to make their way to the temple to return the dagger.
In the climax, Yasmin and Salim infiltrate the Temple of Set and fight their way to the center of the massive structure while Imhotep attempts to chase them down. Moments before they return the dagger to its resting place, they have a blood-curdling encounter with Set himself, whom Imhotep has summoned as a witness to his return. As Set taunts our heroes, his face changes shape for one brief moment, and becomes the face of Lucifer; though the moment is fleeting, it instantly becomes clear that Set and Lucifer are the same being—meaning that Imhotep and Dracula are in thrall to the same master.
Against all odds, they manage to return the dagger just before Imhotep closes in on them. Imhotep cries out to his master Set to save him, but the god turns his back on him, coldly telling him that he's not worthy of his power if he can be foiled by a pair of lowly mortals. Meanwhile, Imhotep's undead soldiers crumble into dust as Napoleon's army holds them off. When the dust settles, the baron has been grievously injured in the fighting, and has lost his right leg.
With that, Salim and Yasmin settle down in Cairo to start a family together. Though Imhotep has been defeated, Napoleon's forces remain in Egypt, and Salim and Yasmin must face the harsh reality of living under foreign occupation. In the final scene, Napoleon sends the injured baron back to Germany for medical treatment, and thanks him for his fine service as he bids him farewell.
"You've fought well. Travel safely, Baron Von Frankenstein..."
Frankenstein: Unchained (2018)
Setting: Germany, 1820
A little over twenty years after Imhotep and his undead army were defeated in Egypt, the German nobleman Alphonse Von Frankenstein—a battle-hardened veteran of the Napoleonic Wars—has settled down and started a family. Haunted by his experiences in Egypt (which he refuses to speak about), he is known for his cold demeanor, and his children Victor and Elizabeth often have a strained relationship with him. Their relationship becomes even more difficult when Alphonse's wife Caroline suddenly dies of scarlet fever when Victor is just a child, causing Alphonse to become a chronically depressed recluse. A bookish child, Victor seeks solace in scientific texts, and soon becomes obsessed with esoteric disciplines like alchemy and mysticism; haunted by the loss of his mother, he is determined to find a way to conquer death through science, and believes that it might be possible to create life in a laboratory.
Though Elizabeth becomes concerned about her brother's mental state, Victor soon proves himself as a science prodigy, and he eventually receives an exclusive invitation to study medicine at Ingolstadt University, a prestigious German university with a rather ghoulish reputation. Though no one has ever been able to prove it, it's rumored that the students and faculty at Ingolstadt often perform grotesque experiments on live human test subjects. Supposedly, some of the students have even done research on how to resurrect the dead.
While studying at Ingolstadt, Victor soon becomes intrigued by the sprawling university and its many hidden places. As he soon learns, the school is also home to a highly exclusive secret society known as "Prodigium", whose members have access to the most jealously guarded texts and research in the school's inner sanctum. Victor exhaustively pursues his studies in science and medicine, and he finally gets his chance to join the ranks of Prodigium when his wealthy roommate Igor Waldman reveals that he is a member, and he tells Victor that he has been nominated for membership. Ecstatic, Victor accompanies Igor to attend Prodigium's initiation ritual on the night of a full moon, and he's finally given access to the secret library at the heart of Ingolstadt.
As the assembled members of Prodigium don hooded cloaks and gather around a circle of candles surrounding a mirror, Victor suddenly realizes—to his utter horror—that the group is actually an occult sect, and they regularly gather in the library for pagan rites and rituals. When the initiation ritual commences, the group begins chanting a prayer to a being known as "The Dark One", and they call Victor forward to join in. When he does, a mysterious black-eyed figure appears in the mirror and beckons to him; as he looks on, the figure's face changes, first becoming the face of Lucifer, then the face of Set. As Victor looks around at his surroundings, he realizes that the room is filled with antique art, including a set of Egyptian hieroglyphs depicting Imhotep, and an oil portrait of Dracula. Though Victor is terrified by all that he sees, Igor convinces him to stay, telling him that Prodigium has the resources to make his dreams a reality.
"I know that you have potential, Victor. You want to create life. Some might call you mad, but we understand. The power to create life shouldn't belong to God alone. You can lead the way into a new age. We'll be right behind you!"
Victor accepts his membership in Prodigium, giving him access to the laboratory in Ingolstadt's inner sanctum—where he has a fully stocked vault of chemicals and scientific equipment at his disposal, along with all of the cadavers and preserved organs that he could ever need. As he begins to experiment on human bodies, Igor moves into the lab to assist him, and he subtly encourages Victor when he begins to have doubts about the ethics of his work. Finally, many months later, Victor manages to piece together a complete human specimen from preserved body parts, and he and Igor prepare to use a lightning storm to bring the specimen to life. As the Creature comes to life on the laboratory slab, Victor—overcome with emotion—names it "Adam", reminded of the story of the Garden of Eden. But Igor rebukes Victor for invoking the Bible, and tells him that he shouldn't get too attached to the Creature. With that, the other members of Prodigium appear and drag the Creature into the crypts beneath the laboratory.
It turns out that Victor was always just a pawn in Prodigium's ultimate plan: creating a living vessel for their master, "The Dark One", that will allow him to cross into the mortal world and rule over humanity. Since the Creature is an artificially created being, he has no soul, making his body the perfect empty vessel for the Dark One's soul. Now that Victor's experiment has succeeded, they have only to wait until the next full moon to perform the summoning ritual.
Against all odds, the Creature successfully manages to escape from the crypts, and he flees into the Bavarian countryside. As Igor and his friends leave the university to hunt him down, Victor sets out to find the Creature before Prodigium does, determined to save him. Fortunately, he finds the Creature taking refuge in a local farmhouse, and he comforts him and brings him food. As the Creature takes shelter, Victor tells him that his true name is "Adam", and he promises that he won't let Prodigium take him. To his surprise, the Creature—Adam—speaks to him, revealing that he's intelligent and capable of understanding human speech. As they take the time to get to know each other, Victor resolves to smuggle him out of the country and take him where Prodigium can't hurt him.
Their moment of peace turns out to be fleeting; some of the local villagers are in league with Prodigium, and they tip Igor off about Victor's location. As Prodigium closes in, Adam fights back, revealing his superhuman strength as he kills six of Igor's goons with his bare hands. Finally, Victor and Adam manage to board a stagecoach, and a frantic chase ensues as they race through the countryside. After several days on the run, they manage to make it to the port of Hamburg, where Victor hopes to find Adam safe passage on a steamship. Unfortunately, Prodigium manages to head them off.
In a climactic final standoff with Igor, Victor sacrifices his life to save Adam as he boards his ship. As the ship pulls away from the port, Adam watches helplessly as his creator dies, and he promises that he'll make his sacrifice a worthy one.
In the final scene, back at the Frankenstein family estate, Elizabeth receives a letter written in handwriting that she doesn't recognize. As she reads it, she breaks down in tears as she learns that her beloved brother Victor has died, but the anonymous sender assures her that he died a noble man.
To her surprise, the letter doesn't come with a return address. As the sender cryptically remarks: "It's best that nobody find me..."
The Wolf Man: Untamed (2020)
Setting: America, 1862
A little over 40 years after the death of Victor Frankenstein, the United States has been split in two by the American Civil War, dividing many American families in the heartland. One such family is the Talbots, a family of poor farmers in rural Kansas, who find themselves caught in the middle of a clash between rival pro-slavery and anti-slavery factions.
One fateful day in 1856, 15 year-old Lawrence Talbot is forced to watch helplessly as his father John Talbot is brutally executed by marauders after he's discovered sheltering slaves. Though he never learns the name of his father's killer, he remembers just one detail about the man: he was carrying a distinctive black walking stick with a silver wolf's head on the handle. Six years later, with the war in full-swing, he reluctantly joins the Union Army, and finds himself deployed to Tennessee to fight the Confederates at Shiloh.
During a frenzied exchange of gunfire, Lawrence suddenly recognizes one of the soldiers in the Confederate Army, and realizes—much to his horror—that it's the marauder who killed his father. Six years after killing John Talbot, the man has risen up the ranks of the Confederate Army, and he is now a decorated lieutenant in the service of Colonel Nathan Bedford Forrest. Though he initially doubts his eyes, Lawrence's suspicions are confirmed when his comrades are called to pursue the retreating Confederates, and he discovers the black walking stick abandoned in the mud, complete with the distinctive wolf's head.
As Talbot and his comrades march through the war-torn countryside, they're eventually caught in a Confederate ambush, forcing Talbot and some of his friends to escape into a nearby forest. Fleeing deeper and deeper into the shadowed woods, they find themselves hopelessly lost when night falls. Before long, they hear a strange growling and snarling in the darkness—the telltale sounds of a wolf on the prowl. One by one, Talbot's companions are dragged off into the woods as the wolf hunts them down, and Talbot desperately tries to flee as he hears them being torn to shreds. He runs as fast as his legs will take him, but he can't outrun the wolf, and he passes out as it pounces on him from behind.
To his surprise, Talbot wakes up in a medical tent in a Confederate prison camp, and finds a surgeon tending to his wounds. The surgeon tells him that the Confederates found in the forest, the sole survivor of an apparent wolf attack. While all of his friends were mangled beyond recognition, Talbot got off with just a bite in the leg, and the wolf apparently left him before it could inflict further injuries.
Though the surgeon mends Talbot's leg wound, he tells Talbot that he has been taken as a prisoner of war, and he'll be held in the camp until further notice. Later, when a Confederate officer comes to interrogate him, Talbot learns that the black walking stick was confiscated during his capture; it turns out that its owner is Lieutenant Paul Montford, a well-known officer in the Tennessee Cavalry.
For days, Talbot languishes in the prison camp, growing progressively more angry at his captors as he endures repeated physical abuse and subsists on meager prison rations. Still, he vows to keep going, knowing that his father's killer is still out there.
Then a full moon rises...
As he watches the full moon rise over the countryside, Talbot suddenly feels thick hair growing all over his body, he feels his teeth growing longer and sharper, and he feels his hands and feet becoming razor-clawed paws. Overcome by feral rage, he lets out a mighty howl as he rips off the door of his holding pen. Roaring and snarling, he charges at the Confederate guards as they surround him and open fire, and he effortlessly tears through their ranks, biting and slashing at every soldier that dares cross him.
As the Rebels and the Union prisoners flee in terror, Talbot finally manages to fight his way to the officer who interrogated him. Pinning the helpless man to the ground, he snatches the black walking stick out of his hand. As he holds it in front of him, he snarls a single word:
"WHERE?!"
Terrified, the officer replies "Corinth Road!", and Talbot leaves him alive as he bounds off into the distance toward Corinth Road.
Sure enough, Montford and his men are making camp upcountry, near Corinth Road. As Talbot makes his way to the camp, the sun eventually rises, restoring his human form. Still, he charges forward, determined to kill Montford at all costs.
With his clothes shredded by his transformation, Talbot creeps into the camp when night falls again, and he manages to steal a spare Confederate uniform from a sleeping soldier's pack. In disguise, he sneaks into Montford's tent with a pistol in hand, prepared to shoot him on the spot.
To his surprise, Montford stays completely calm when he sees him, and gives him a knowing smile.
"I had a feeling you'd find me, one of these days. You never stop. Neither would I, if somebody had done to me what I did to you. Don't worry, Talbot. I don't blame you for turning that gun on me. An animal can't tame his instincts. I suppose only one of us is leaving this tent alive."
Confused, Talbot demands to know why Montford is accepting his fate so calmly.
"You've got the rage of a wild beast in you, son," Montford says. "So do I. That's why I let you live. Even a wolf can sense a kindred spirit."
Horrified, Talbot flashes back to the night in the forest when the wolf bit him, and he realizes that Montford was the wolf all along. Montford is a werewolf, and he carries the wolf-head cane because he came to terms with his beastly nature long ago, and now accepts it as a part of who he is. That night, he recognized Talbot as the son of the man he killed, and he chose to pass on his lycanthropy to him rather than killing him, believing that he deserved a chance to take his revenge.
As Talbot realizes the truth, Montford changes into his lupine form and prepares to fight him—since he has years of experience in using his abilities, and he no longer needs the power of the full moon to become a werewolf. Talbot futilely tries fight him off with his pistol, but Montford goads him on, telling him to surrender to the wolf's instincts and embrace his true self.
Flashing back to the night that his father was killed, Talbot finally loses control of his anger and feels his animalistic side overtaking his mind. As he becomes a werewolf again, he squares off with Montford in an epic one-on-one battle. He sustains multiple serious injuries in the fight, but ultimately manages to slash his throat with his claws, killing him.
Just at that moment, Talbot's Union comrades finally arrive at the camp after days of chasing the Confederates. When they find Talbot—now a werewolf—standing over Montford's bloodied corpse, they surround him and open fire. Now fully lost to his werewolf instincts, Talbot charges at his old friends, attacking them as ferociously as he attacked the Confederates.
After taking multiple bullet wounds, Talbot is finally forced to flee, but the Union soldiers pursue him through the forests. As word spreads of a wild beast on the loose, Talbot finds himself chased by more soldiers every day, and he's forced to flee into the Appalachian highlands to escape them. After weeks on the run, moving further north with every day, he eventually finds himself in the thick evergreen forests near the Canadian border, where the weather grows bitterly cold. Finally, after going days without food, Talbot reverts to his human form as he collapses in the forest from exhaustion, accepting that he can run no longer.
But as he waits to die, Talbot is approached by a tall figure in a battered leather overcoat, whose face is hidden by a thick hood. The mysterious figure gathers him in his arms and carries him off to a nearby cabin, where he wraps him in animal skins and brings him food.
As soon as Talbot wakes up, we get a good look at his rescuer, and we see that it's none other than Frankenstein's Creature! Forty decades after escaping Prodigium, the Creature is still alive and well, and living a life of seclusion in the Canadian wilderness.
As he regains his strength, Talbot breaks down in tears as he realizes what he did. He's gotten his revenge, but he fears that he's lost his humanity in the process.
"I'm a monster..." he sadly laments.
The Creature puts a comforting hand on his shoulder.
"They called me a monster once, too. But it doesn't matter. Even a monster has a soul, and even the most troubled soul can find redemption. You'll find yours too, even if the journey is longer than you'd like. There are darker things in this world than the empty space in your heart, friend."
Reflecting on all that he's seen and done, Talbot ventures outside the cabin and takes in the unspoiled beauty of the forest, realizing that the woods are now his only home. But as long as he has at least one friend, perhaps they're not such a bad home...
But after the credits roll, we see a mysterious dark-haired man creep through the shadowed pathways of the Carpathian Mountains, making his way towards the rubble of Castle Dracula. As he approaches the ruined castle, a familiar voice speaks to him from the depths of the castle's crypt. It's the voice of Dracula—who's still alive after all these years, and hungry for revenge.
"It's time, Renfield, he says. "The Dark One hungers for sacrifice. But he has other servants than me. Go to Egypt. In the Temple of Set, you'll find the one who will join us. With him on our side, the armies of the dead will be unstoppable!"
At the Mediterranean coast, Renfield boards a steamship headed for Egypt, and the screen goes dark...
TL;DR: The films are all set in different historical periods, building up to a four-way battle between Dracula, the Wolf Man, the Mummy and Frankenstein's Monster. The overarching villain is a figure known as "The Dark One" (also known as "Lucifer" and "Set"), who lurks in the background.
Dracula Untold: In 15th century Transylvania, the warrior prince Matthias Corvinus embarks on a quest to confront his rival Vlad (aka "Dracula") after witnessing a series of vampire attacks, and he discovers that Vlad has pledged his soul to Lucifer in exchange for eternal life. In the finale, Vlad's castle is destroyed by the armies of the Ottoman sultan, temporarily defeating him.
The Mummy Unconquered: During Napoleon Bonaparte's invasion of Egypt in 1798, French soldiers attempt to steal a powerful Egyptian artifact, but accidentally unleash the undead priest Imhotep and his army of mummies, who answer to the god Set. In the finale, Napoleon's army battles Imhotep's undead legions in a massive battle sequence, and one of Napoleon's German commanders is revealed to be Baron von Frankenstein.
Frankenstein Unchained: Baron von Frankenstein's son Victor leaves home to study medicine at the shady Ingolstadt University, where his roommate Igor Waldman invites him to join the clandestine mystic cult "Prodigium". When Victor creates his Creature (aka "Adam"), he discovers that Prodigium actually wants to use him as a living vessel for "The Dark One", who they worship. In the finale, Victor sacrifices himself to save Adam from Igor, and Adam flees Europe in a steamship.
The Wolf Man Untamed: During the American Civil War, Kansan farmboy Lawrence Talbot joins the Union Army in hopes of finding the Confederate soldier who killed his father, but he finds himself bitten by a werewolf while stranded in the woods during a battle. He ultimately gets the revenge that he seeks, but nearly loses his mind to his new animal instincts, forcing him to flee into the wilds of Canada to escape his old comrades. In the finale, he is taken in by a mysterious forest-dwelling hermit, who turns out to be Frankenstein's Creature.
submitted by themightyheptagon to fixingmovies [link] [comments]

Cinephile challenge: Have you watched at least one film from each category?

The following gives you an overview of relevant movies. There are 138 categories. You can use this as a challenge: make sure that you have watched at least one film from each category.
(1) 80s action First Blood (1982) Conan the Barbarian (1982) The Terminator (1984) Commando (1985) Top Gun (1986) Predator (1987) RoboCop (1987) Die Hard (1988) Bloodsport (1988) The Killer (1989)
(2) Black comedy Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966) Withnail & I (1987) Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown (1988) Man Bites Dog (1992) Happiness (1998) Snatch (2000) Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (2005) In Bruges (2008) Wild Tales (2014) Ingrid Goes West (2017)
(3) Coen brothers Blood Simple. (1984) Raising Arizona (1987) Miller's Crossing (1990) Barton Fink (1991) Fargo (1996) The Big Lebowski (1998) O Brother, Where Art Thou? (2000) A Serious Man (2009) Inside Llewyn Davis (2013)
(4) Film noir The Maltese Falcon (1941) Double Indemnity (1944) Laura (1944) Mildred Pierce (1945) The Lost Weekend (1945) The Big Sleep (1946) Out of the Past (1947) They Live by Night (1948) The Third Man (1949) In a Lonely Place (1950) Night and the City (1950) Ace in the Hole (1951) Rififi (1955) Kiss Me Deadly (1955) Sweet Smell of Success (1957)
(5) French New Wave The 400 Blows (1959) Breathless (1960) A Woman Is a Woman (1961) Léon Morin, Priest (1961) Jules and Jim (1962) Vivre Sa Vie (1962) Contempt (1963) Band of Outsiders (1964) The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (1964) Pierrot le Fou (1965) Two or Three Things I Know About Her... (1967) Weekend (1967) My Night at Maud's (1969)
(6) Left Bank Hiroshima Mon Amour (1959) Last Year at Marienbad (1961) La Jetée (1962) Cleo from 5 to 7 (1962) Le Bonheur (1965)
(7) Richard Linklater Dazed and Confused (1993) Before Sunrise (1995) Waking Life (2001) Before Sunset (2004) A Scanner Darkly (2006) Before Midnight (2013)
(8) Serial killer Henry (1986) The Silence of the Lambs (1991) Se7en (1995) Zodiac (2007)
(9) Screwball comedy It Happened One Night (1934) The Awful Truth (1937) Bringing Up Baby (1938) His Girl Friday (1940) The Philadelphia Story (1940) The Lady Eve (1941)
(10) Vigilante films Dirty Harry (1971) Straw Dogs (1971) Death Wish (1974) Falling Down (1993) Walking Tall (2004) John Wick (2014)
(11) Terrence Malick Badlands (1973) Days of Heaven (1978) The Thin Red Line (1998) The New World (2005) The Tree of Life (2011) Knight of Cups (2015)
(12) Drugs Trainspotting (1996) Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (1998) Requiem for a Dream (2000) Traffic (2000) Blow (2001) Maria Full of Grace (2004)
(13) Buster Keaton Sherlock Jr. (1924) The General (1926) Steamboat Bill, Jr. (1928) The Cameraman (1928) Our Hospitality (1928)
(14) Disaster Airport (1970) Apollo 13 (1995) Twister (1996) Deep Impact (1998) The Day After Tomorrow (2004) Deepwater Horizon (2016)
(15) Neo-noir Point Blank (1967) Chinatown (1974) Thief (1981) L.A. Confidential (1997) Sin City (2005) Drive (2011) Blade Runner 2049 (2017)
(16) Cars & Racing Vanishing Point (1971) Gone in 60 Seconds (1974) Death Race 2000 (1975) Rush (2013) The Fast and the Furious (2001) Days of Thunder (1990) Speed Racer (2008)
(17) 1920s Greed (1924) Battleship Potemkin (1925) Metropolis (1927) Sunrise (1927) Napoleon (1927) The Crowd (1928)
(18) Adventure The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948) Deliverance (1972) Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981) Pirates of the Caribbean (2003) Master and Commander (2003) Apocalypto (2006) Life of Pi (2012) Hunt for the Wilderpeople (2016)
(19) Genius Rain Man (1988) Searching for Bobby Fischer (1993) Good Will Hunting (1997) A Beautiful Mind (2001)
(20) South Korea Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring (2003) Oldboy (2003) 3-Iron (2004) Mother (2009) I Saw the Devil (2010)
(21) Ingmar Bergman The Seventh Seal (1957) Wild Strawberries (1957) Through a Glass Darkly (1961) Winter Light (1963) Persona (1966) Cries & Whispers (1972) Scenes from a Marriage (1973) Autumn Sonata (1978) Fanny and Alexander (1982)
(22) Billy Wilder Sunset Boulevard (1950) Some Like It Hot (1959) The Apartment (1960) One, Two, Three (1961) Witness for the Prosecution (1957)
(23) Comedy-drama One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975) Being There (1979) My Dinner with Andre (1981) The Breakfast Club (1985) The Fisher King (1991) Groundhog Day (1993) Forrest Gump (1994) Buffalo '66 (1998) The Truman Show (1998) The Man Without a Past (2002) Lost in Translation (2003) Little Miss Sunshine (2006) Frances Ha (2012) Toni Erdmann (2016)
(24) Drama Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939) Gone with the Wind (1939) The Grapes of Wrath (1940) All About Eve (1950) A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) From Here to Eternity (1953) On the Waterfront (1954) Splendor in the Grass (1961) Midnight Cowboy (1969) À Nos Amours (1983) Vagabond (1985) The Piano (1993) La Haine (1995) Secrets & Lies (1996) The Ice Storm (1997) The Celebration (1998) All About My Mother (1999) Ratcatcher (1999) Amores Perros (2000) La Ciénaga (2001) Morvern Callar (2002) 25th Hour (2002) Elephant (2003) Mysterious Skin (2004) Babel (2006) 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days (2007) Wendy and Lucy (2008) The Social Network (2010) Incendies (2010) Once Upon a Time in Anatolia (2011) Shame (2011) The Hunt (2012) The Place Beyond the Pines (2012) Winter Sleep (2014) Mommy (2014) Son of Saul (2015) Room (2015) Spotlight (2015) Manchester by the Sea (2016) Paterson (2016) Columbus (2017) The Florida Project (2017)
(25) James Bond Dr. No (1962) Goldfinger (1964) Casino Royale (2006) Skyfall (2012) The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) GoldenEye (1995)
(26) Romantic comedy Roman Holiday (1953) Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961) The Princess Bride (1987) When Harry Met Sally... (1989) There’s Something About Mary (1998) Amélie (2001) Punch-Drunk Love (2002) Sideways (2004) The 40 Year Old Virgin (2005) 500 Days of Summer (2009)
(27) Robert Bresson Diary of a Country Priest (1951) A Man Escaped (1956) Pickpocket (1959) Au Hasard Balthazar (1966) Mouchette (1967) The Devil, Probably (1977) L'Argent (1983)
(28) Political thriller Z (1969) Three Days of the Condor (1975) All the President's Men (1976) Blow Out (1981) Patriot Games (1992) The Lives of Others (2006) The Ides of March (2011) The Post (2017)
(29) Parody/spoof Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein (1948) Dark Star (1974) Airplane! (1980) The Princess Bride (1987) Spaceballs (1987) The Naked Gun (1988) Hot Shots! (1991) Robin Hood: Men in Tights (1993) Austin Powers (1997) Galaxy Quest (1999) Black Dynamite (2009)
(30) Orson Welles Citizen Kane (1941) Touch of Evil (1958) The Trial (1962) Chimes at Midnight (1965) F for Fake (1973)
(31) Pixar Toy Story (1995) Finding Nemo (2003) Ratatouille (2007) WALL·E (2008) Up (2009) Inside Out (2015) Coco (2017)
(32) Pre-Code Hollywood The Blue Angel (1930) Frankenstein (1931) Freaks (1932) King Kong (1933) Duck Soup (1933) The Thin Man (1934)
(33) Superhero Superman (1978) X-Men (2000) Spider-Man (2002) The Dark Knight (2008) Iron Man (2008) The Avengers (2012) Guardians of the Galaxy (2014) Logan (2017)
(34) War All Quiet on the Western Front (1930) The Longest Day (1962) The Train (1964) The Deer Hunter (1978) Apocalypse Now (1979) Das Boot (1981) Platoon (1986) Saving Private Ryan (1998) Black Hawk Down (2001) Dunkirk (2017)
(35) Stanley Kubrick Paths of Glory (1957) Lolita (1962) Dr. Strangelove (1964) 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) A Clockwork Orange (1971) Barry Lyndon (1975) The Shining (1980) Full Metal Jacket (1987) Eyes Wide Shut (1999)
(36) Surrealism Entr'acte (1924) The Seashell and the Clergyman (1928) L'Étoile de Mer (1928) An Andalusian Dog (1929) L'Age d'Or (1930) The Blood of a Poet (1930) Meshes of the Afternoon (1943)
(37) Western Stagecoach (1939) The Ox-Bow Incident (1943) My Darling Clementine (1946) High Noon (1952) Shane (1953) The Searchers (1956) Rio Bravo (1959) The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962) The Wild Bunch (1969) Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) Dances with Wolves (1990) Unforgiven (1992) Meek's Cutoff (2010)
(38) Spaghetti Western A Fistful of Dollars (1964) For a Few Dollars More (1965) Django (1966) The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966) Once Upon a Time in the West (1968) The Great Silence (1968) Duck, You Sucker! (1971)
(39) Swashbuckler Captain Blood (1935) The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938) The Sea Hawk (1940) The Four Musketeers (1974) The Three Musketeers (1993) The Mask of Zorro (1998)
(40) Werner Herzog Aguirre, the Wrath of God (1972) The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser (1974) Stroszek (1977) La Soufrière (1977) Nosferatu the Vampyre (1979) Fitzcarraldo (1982) Grizzly Man (2005)
(41) Nunsploitation The Devils (1971) School of the Holy Beast (1974) Killer Nun (1979) Nuns on the Run (1990) Nude Nuns with Big Guns (2010) The Little Hours (2017)
(42) Psycho-Thriller Peeping Tom (1960) The Innocents (1961) Repulsion (1965) Bad Timing (1980) Possession (1981) Misery (1990) Jacob's Ladder (1990) Memento (2000) Martyrs (2008) Shutter Island (2010) Black Swan (2010) Only God Forgives (2013) Gone Girl (2014) Room (2015) The Neon Demon (2016)
(43) Krzysztof Kieślowski Dekalog (1989) The Double Life of Veronique (1991) Three Colors Trilogy (1993)
(44) Akira Kurosawa Rashomon (1950) Ikiru (1952) Seven Samurai (1954) Throne of Blood (1957) The Hidden Fortress (1958) Yojimbo (1961) Sanjuro (1962) High and Low (1963) Red Beard (1965) Kagemusha (1980) Ran (1985) Dreams (1990)
(45) LGBT Girls in Uniform (1931) Funeral Parade of Roses (1969) Je, tu, il, elle (1974) Paris Is Burning (1990) My Own Private Idaho (1991) All about My Mother (1999) Beau travail (1999) Tropical Malady (2004) Brokeback Mountain (2005) Shortbus (2006) Weekend (2011) Blue Is the Warmest Color (2013) Carol (2015) Moonlight (2016) Call Me by Your Name (2017)
(46) Yasujirô Ozu Late Spring (1949) Early Summer (1951) Tokyo Story (1953) Good Morning (1959) Floating Weeds (1959) An Autumn Afternoon (1962)
(47) Wuxia Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000) Hero (2002) House of Flying Daggers (2004) The Assassin (2015)
(48) Woody Allen Annie Hall (1977) Manhattan (1979) The Purple Rose of Cairo (1985) Hannah and Her Sisters (1986) Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989) Match Point (2005) Midnight in Paris (2011)
(49) Survival Walkabout (1971) The Edge (1997) Cast Away (2000) Shackleton (2002) Touching the Void (2003) Into the Wild (2007) 127 Hours (2010) All Is Lost (2013) The Revenant (2015)
(50) Robert Altman MAS*H (1970) McCabe & Mrs. Miller (1971) The Long Goodbye (1973) Nashville (1975) The Player (1992) Short Cuts (1993) Gosford Park (2001)
(51) Aliens Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977) Alien (1979) E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982) The Thing (1982) Aliens (1986) They Live (1988) The Abyss (1989) Independence Day (1996) District 9 (2009) Arrival (2016) Annihilation (2018)
(52) Rainer Werner Fassbinder The Merchant of Four Seasons (1971) The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant (1972) Ali: Fear Eats the Soul (1973) In a Year with 13 Moons (1978) Berlin Alexanderplatz (1980) Veronika Voss (1982)
(53) Michelangelo Antonioni L'Avventura (1960) La Notte (1961) L'Eclisse (1962) Red Desert (1964) Blow-Up (1966)
(54) Martial Arts Fist of Fury (1972) Enter the Dragon (1973) The Street Fighter (1974) Drunken Master (1978) The 36th Chamber of Shaolin (1978) Wheels on Meals (1984) Police Story (1985) Riki-Oh: The Story of Ricky (1991) Ong Bak (2003) Ip Man (2008)
(55) Lars von Trier Breaking the Waves (1996) The Idiots (1998) Dancer in the Dark (2000) Dogville (2003) The Five Obstructions (2003) Antichrist (2009) Melancholia (2011)
(56) Horror Cat People (1942) Rosemary's Baby (1968) Night of the Living Dead (1968) The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974) Halloween (1978) Dawn of the Dead (1978) Friday the 13th (1980) A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984) Scream (1996) The Village (2004) The Descent (2005) Let the Right One In (2008) The Witch (2015) It Follows (2015) The Wailing (2016) It (2017)
(57) Supernatural horror The Exorcist (1973) Poltergeist (1982) The Devil's Advocate (1997) The Blair Witch Project (1999) The Sixth Sense (1999) The Others (2001) The Babadook (2014)
(58) Romantic drama Casablanca (1942) Brief Encounter (1945) Letter from an Unknown Woman (1948) All That Heaven Allows (1955) Imitation of Life (1959) Doctor Zhivago (1965) Romeo and Juliet (1968) The Remains of the Day (1993) Sense and Sensibility (1995) Titanic (1997) The Notebook (2004) Atonement (2007) Blue Valentine (2010) Laurence Anyways (2012)
(59) Wes Anderson Rushmore (1998) The Royal Tenenbaums (2001) The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou (2004) The Darjeeling Limited (2007) Fantastic Mr. Fox (2009) Moonrise Kingdom (2012) The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014)
(60) Thriller M (1931) The Night of the Hunter (1955) The French Connection (1971) The Conversation (1974) Sorcerer (1977) The Vanishing (1988) Jurassic Park (1993) Speed (1994) Run Lola Run (1998) The Bourne Identity (2002) Infernal Affairs (2002) Collateral (2004) Miami Vice (2006) No Country for Old Men (2007) Prisoners (2013) Nightcrawler (2014) Green Room (2015)
(61) Michael Haneke The Seventh Continent (1989) Funny Games (1997) Code Unknown (2000) The Piano Teacher (2001) Caché (2005) The White Ribbon (2009) Amour (2012)
(62) Giallo The Girl Who Knew Too Much (1963) The Bird with the Crystal Plumage (1970) Deep Red (1975) Suspiria (1977) Tenebrae (1982) The New York Ripper (1982)
(63) Musical Top Hat (1935) The Wizard of Oz (1939) Meet Me in St. Louis (1944) Singin' in the Rain (1952) A Star Is Born (1954) West Side Story (1961) Mary Poppins (1964) The Sound of Music (1965) Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory (1971) Cabaret (1972) Jesus Christ Superstar (1973) Phantom of the Paradise (1974) The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975) Saturday Night Fever (1977) Grease (1978) All That Jazz (1979) Little Shop of Horrors (1986) Moulin Rouge! (2001) Les Misérables (2012) La La Land (2016)
(64) Racism To Kill a Mockingbird (1962) In the Heat of the Night (1967) The Color Purple (1985) Do the Right Thing (1989) American History X (1998) This Is England (2006) 12 Years a Slave (2013) Selma (2014) Get Out (2017)
(65) Federico Fellini I Vitelloni (1953) La Strada (1954) The Nights of Cabiria (1957) La Dolce Vita (1960) 8½ (1963) Juliet of the Spirits (1965) Satyricon (1969) Amarcord (1973)
(66) Early cinema The Arrival of a Train (1896) The Kiss (1896) The Man with the Rubber Head (1901) A Trip to the Moon (1902) The Great Train Robbery (1903) Gertie the Dinosaur (1914) The Birth of a Nation (1915) Intolerance (1916)
(67) David Lynch Eraserhead (1977) The Elephant Man (1980) Blue Velvet (1986) Wild at Heart (1990) Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me (1992) Lost Highway (1997) Mulholland Drive (2001) Inland Empire (2006)
(68) Crime Le Samouraï (1967) The Godfather (1972) The Killing of a Chinese Bookie (1976) Scarface (1983) Once Upon a Time in America (1984) The Untouchables (1987) The Cook, the Thief, His Wife & Her Lover (1989) Heat (1995) City of God (2002) Catch Me If You Can (2002) Memories of Murder (2003) Lord of War (2005) The Town (2010) Victoria (2015) Sicario (2015) Baby Driver (2017) Good Time (2017)
(69) Heist The Sting (1973) Dog Day Afternoon (1975) The First Great Train Robbery (1978) Ocean's Eleven (2001) Heist (2001) The Italian Job (2003) Inside Man (2006) Inception (2010) The Town (2010)
(70) Paul Thomas Anderson Boogie Nights (1997) Magnolia (1999) There Will Be Blood (2007) The Master (2012) Phantom Thread (2017)
(71) Action comedy 48 Hrs. (1982) Lethal Weapon (1987) Maverick (1994) True Lies (1994) Bad Boys (1995) Men in Black (1997) Starship Troopers (1997) Three Kings (1999) Kung Fu Hustle (2004) Hot Fuzz (2007) 21 Jump Street (2012) Spy (2015) Deadpool (2016)
(72) Anime Angel's Egg (1985) Grave of the Fireflies (1988) Akira (1988) Ghost in the Shell (1995) Neon Genesis Evangelion: The End of Evangelion (1997) Perfect Blue (1997) Jin-Roh: The Wolf Brigade (1999) Millennium Actress (2001) Mind Game (2004) Paprika (2006) The Tale of the Princess Kaguya (2013) Your Name. (2016)
(73) David Cronenberg Videodrome (1983) The Fly (1986) Naked Lunch (1991) A History of Violence (2005) Eastern Promises (2007)
(74) Docufiction Nanook of the North (1922) On the Bowery (1956) In Vanda's Room (2000) Colossal Youth (2006) My Winnipeg (2007)
(75) Edward Yang Taipei Story (1985) A Brighter Summer Day (1991) Yi Yi (2000)
(76) Fantasy The Dark Crystal (1982) The NeverEnding Story (1984) Delicatessen (1991) Being John Malkovich (1999) The Fellowship of the Ring (2001) Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (2001) Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004) Pan's Labyrinth (2006) The Fall (2006) Avatar (2009) Holy Motors (2012) A Ghost Story (2017) The Shape of Water (2017)
(77) Sharks Jaws (1975) Deep Blue Sea (1999) Mega Shark vs. Giant Octopus (2009) Shark Night (2011) Sharknado (2013) The Shallows (2016)
(78) Quentin Tarantino Reservoir Dogs (1992) Pulp Fiction (1994) Jackie Brown (1997) Kill Bill (2003) Inglourious Basterds (2009) Django Unchained (2012) The Hateful Eight (2015)
(79) Japan Ugetsu (1953) Sansho the Bailiff (1954) Harakiri (1962) Woman in the Dunes (1964) Kwaidan (1964) Onibaba (1964) The Face of Another (1966) Eros + Massacre (1969) Maborosi (1995) Cure (1997) All About Lily Chou-Chou (2001) Happiness of the Katakuris (2002) Nobody Knows (2004) Strange Circus (2005) The Calamari Wrestler (2005) Big Man Japan (2007) Love Exposure (2008) Confessions (2010) Like Father, Like Son (2013)
(80) Jacques Tati Monsieur Hulot's Holiday (1953) Mon Oncle (1958) Playtime (1967)
(81) Alfred Hitchcock Rebecca (1940) Shadow of a Doubt (1943) Notorious (1946) Rope (1948) Strangers on a Train (1951) Dial M for Murder (1954) Rear Window (1954) Vertigo (1958) North by Northwest (1959) Psycho (1960) The Birds (1963)
(82) Animation Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937) Pinocchio (1940) Fantasia (1940) Dumbo (1941) Bambi (1942) Fantastic Planet (1973) The Twelve Tasks of Asterix (1976) Only Yesterday (1991) Beauty and the Beast (1991) The Lion King (1994) The Prince of Egypt (1998) The Iron Giant (1999) The Triplets of Belleville (2003) The Incredibles (2004) Persepolis (2007) Waltz with Bashir (2008) How to Train Your Dragon (2010) It's Such a Beautiful Day (2012) The Red Turtle (2016)
(83) Iran Where is the Friend's Home? (1987) Close-Up (1990) A Moment of Innocence (1996) Taste of Cherry (1997) Certified Copy (2010) A Separation (2011) The Salesman (2015)
(84) Jean Renoir A Day in the Country (1936) La Grande Illusion (1937) The Rules of the Game (1939) French Cancan (1955)
(85) Monster The Blob (1953) Godzilla (1954) Tarantula (1955) Cloverfield (2008) Trollhunter (2010)
(86) Wim Wenders Alice in the Cities (1974) Kings of the Road (1976) The American Friend (1977) Paris, Texas (1984) Wings of Desire (1987)
(87) Teen American Graffiti (1973) Over the Edge (1979) The Warriors (1979) Rock 'n' Roll High School (1979) Rumble Fish (1983) Ferris Bueller's Day Off (1986) Stand by Me (1986) Boyz n the Hood (1991) Kids (1995) Fucking Åmål (1998) Heathers (1988) Ken Park (2002) Mean Girls (2004) Superbad (2007) Scott Pilgrim vs. the World (2010) Spring Breakers (2012) The Perks of Being a Wallflower (2012) Boyhood (2014) Lady Bird (2017)
(88) Buster Keaton Our Hospitality (1923) Sherlock Jr. (1924) The General (1926) Steamboat Bill, Jr. (1928) The Cameraman (1928)
(89) Cannibal films Cannibal Holocaust (1980) Eaten Alive! (1980) Cannibal Ferox (1981) Cannibal Women in the Avocado Jungle of Death (1989) Cannibal! The Musical (1993)
(90) Carl Theodor Dreyer The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928) Vampyr (1932) Day of Wrath (1943) Ordet (1955) Gertrud (1964)
(91) Hippie The Love-Ins (1967) Psych-Out (1968) Zabriskie Point (1970) Hair (1979)
(92) Martin Scorsese Mean Streets (1973) Taxi Driver (1976) Raging Bull (1980) The King of Comedy (1982) After Hours (1985) Goodfellas (1990) The Age of Innocence (1993) Casino (1995) The Departed (2006) The Wolf of Wall Street (2013)
(93) Mystery Picnic at Hanging Rock (1975) Clue (1985) The Usual Suspects (1995) The Game (1997) Donnie Darko (2001) The Prestige (2006) The Man from Earth (2007)
(94) Pier Paolo Pasolini The Gospel According to St. Matthew (1964) The Hawks and the Sparrows (1966) Teorema (1968) Salò, or the 120 Days of Sodom (1975)
(95) Prison The Great Escape (1963) Cool Hand Luke (1967) Escape from Alcatraz (1979) The Shawshank Redemption (1994) A Prophet (2009)
(96) Yakuza Tokyo Drifter (1966) Branded to Kill (1967) Ichi the Killer (2001) Zatōichi (2003) Outrage (2010)
(97) War drama The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957) Die Brücke (1959) Lawrence of Arabia (1962) The Battle of Algiers (1966) The Cranes Are Flying (1957) Come and See (1985) Schindler's List (1993) The Pianist (2002) Downfall (2004) The Hurt Locker (2008) Beasts of No Nation (2015)
(98) German expressionism The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920) The Golem (1920) Nosferatu (1922) The Last Laugh (1924)
(99) Comedy Big Deal on Madonna Street (1958) Divorce, Italian Style (1962) The Pink Panther (1963) The Great Race (1965) The Odd Couple (1968) Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975) Life of Brian (1979) The Jerk (1979) The Gods Must Be Crazy (1980) Tampopo (1985) A Fish Called Wanda (1988) My Cousin Vinny (1992) Office Space (1999) Jackass: The Movie (2002) Anchorman (2004) Borat (2006) The Hangover (2009)
(100) 90s action Total Recall (1990) Terminator 2 (1991) Point Break (1991) El Mariachi (1992) The Fugitive (1993) The Rock (1996) Mission: Impossible (1996) Con Air (1997) Face/Off (1997) The Matrix (1999)
(101) Andrei Tarkovsky Andrei Rublev (1966) Solaris (1971) The Mirror (1974) Stalker (1979) Nostalgia (1983) The Sacrifice (1986)
(102) Satire Sullivan's Travels (1941) The Producers (1967) If.... (1968) Blazing Saddles (1974) Network (1976) American Beauty (1999) Fight Club (1999) American Psycho (2000) Thank You for Smoking (2005) Idiocracy (2006) In the Loop (2009)
(103) Music A Hard Day's Night (1964) The Blues Brothers (1980) Pink Floyd: The Wall (1982) This Is Spinal Tap (1984) Stop Making Sense (1984) Amadeus (1984) Sister Act (1992) Buena Vista Social Club (1999) Almost Famous (2000) 8 Mile (2002) Ray (2004) Whiplash (2014)
(104) Alejandro Jodorowsky El Topo (1970) The Holy Mountain (1973) Santa Sangre (1989)
(105) Avant-garde documentary Man With a Movie Camera (1929) Blow Job (1964) News from Home (1977) Koyaanisqatsi (1982) Baraka (1992) La Commune (Paris, 1871) (2000) I was moving ahead … (2000) Habitat (2012)
(106) Ernst Lubitsch I Don't Want to Be a Man (1918) Trouble in Paradise (1932) Ninotchka (1939) The Shop Around the Corner (1940) To Be or Not to Be (1942)
(107) Erotic Last Tango in Paris (1972) In the Realm of the Senses (1976) Body Double (1984) Basic Instinct (1992) The Handmaiden (2016)
(108) Sci-fi The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951) Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956) Planet of the Apes (1968) THX 1138 (1971) Star Wars (1977) Blade Runner (1982) Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982) On the Silver Globe (1988) Twelve Monkeys (1995) Star Trek: First Contact (1996) The Fifth Element (1997) Gattaca (1997) The Matrix (1999) A.I. Artificial Intelligence (2001) Minority Report (2002) Primer (2004) Moon (2009) Cloud Atlas (2012) Her (2013) Gravity (2013) Edge of Tomorrow (2014) Ex Machina (2014) Interstellar (2014) The Martian (2015)
(109) Tim Burton Edward Scissorhands (1990) The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993) Ed Wood (1994) Mars Attacks! (1996) Big Fish (2003) Sweeney Todd (2007)
(110) Stoner films Up in Smoke (1978) Half Baked (1998) How High (2001) Pineapple Express (2008)
(111) Sports drama The Hustler (1961) Rocky (1976) Remember the Titans (2000) Million Dollar Baby (2004) The Wrestler (2008) The Fighter (2010) Moneyball (2011) Creed (2015)
(112) Powell & Pressburger The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943) The Red Shoes (1948) Black Narcissus (1947)
(113) Dystopia Nineteen Eighty-Four (1984) Brazil (1985) Dark City (1998) Battle Royale (2000) 28 Days Later... (2002) V for Vendetta (2005) Children of Men (2006) The Road (2009) Snowpiercer (2013) The Maze Runner (2014)
(114) Luis Buñuel The Young and the Damned (1950) Viridiana (1961) The Exterminating Angel (1962) Simon of the Desert (1965) Belle de Jour (1967) The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972) That Obscure Object of Desire (1977)
(115) Documentary Night and Fog (1956) Shoah (1985) The Thin Blue Line (1988) Hoop Dreams (1994) Man on Wire (2008) Jiro Dreams of Sushi (2011) Leviathan (2012) The Act of Killing (2012) Tim's Vermeer (2013)
(116) Modern action 300 (2006) The Raid: Redemption (2011) Dredd (2012) Mad Max: Fury Road (2015) Hardcore Henry (2016)
(118) Rape revenge The Virgin Spring (1960) I Spit on Your Grave (1978) Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance (2002) Irreversible (2002) I Saw the Devil (2010)
(119) Wong Kar-wai Chungking Express (1994) Fallen Angels (1995) Happy Together (1997) In the Mood for Love (2000) 2046 (2004)
(120) Horror comedy Young Frankenstein (1974) House (1977) An American Werewolf in London (1981) Dead Alive (1992) Shaun of the Dead (2004) The Cabin in the Woods (2012) What We Do in the Shadows (2014)
(121) Courtroom drama 12 Angry Men (1957) Anatomy of a Murder (1959) Judgment at Nuremberg (1961) The Verdict (1982) A Few Good Men (1992) The Rainmaker (1997)
(122) Charlie Chaplin The Tramp (1915) The Kid (1921) The Circus (1928) City Lights (1931) The Great Dictator (1940) Limelight (1952)
(123) Yakuza Tokyo Drifter (1966) Branded to Kill (1967) Ichi the Killer (2001) Zatōichi (2003) Outrage (2010)
(124) Splatter Blood Feast (1963) The Wizard of Gore (1970) The Evil Dead (1981) Bad Taste (1987)
(125) Africa Black Girl (1966) Touki Bouki (1973) Hotel Rwanda (2004) Moolaadé (2004) Timbuktu (2014)
(126) Ancient Rome Quo Vadis (1951) Ben-Hur (1959) Spartacus (1960) Cleopatra (1963) Caligula (1979) Gladiator (2000)
(127) Biography The Life of Emile Zola (1937) Patton (1970) Gandhi (1982) Malcolm X (1992) Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters (1985) Schindler's List (1993) Monster (2003) The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007) Lincoln (2012)
(128) John Cassavetes Shadows (1958) Faces (1968) A Woman Under the Influence (1974)
(129) Eastern Europe Ashes and Diamonds (1958) Daisies (1966) Cremator (1969) Valerie and Her Week of Wonders (1970) Damnation (1988) Satantango (1994) Underground (1995) Black Cat, White Cat (1998) Werckmeister Harmonies (2000) No Man's Land (2001) The Turin Horse (2011) Ida (2013)
(130) Russia Brother (1997) Russian Ark (2002) The Return (2003) The Sun (2005) Hard to Be a God (2013) Leviathan (2014)
(131) Religion The Ten Commandments (1956) The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965) The Mission (1986) The Last Temptation of Christ (1988) The Passion of the Christ (2004) Silence (2016)
(132) Cult films Attack of the 50 Foot Woman (1958) Barbarella (1968) Pink Flamingos (1972) Tron (1982) Ghostbusters (1984) Repo Man (1984) The Toxic Avenger (1984) Back to the Future (1985) Big Trouble in Little China (1986) Surf Nazis Must Die (1987) Honey, I Shrunk the Kids (1989) Army of Darkness (1992) Wayne’s World (1992) Clerks (1994) Bad Boy Bubby (1994) Dude, Where’s My Car? (2000) Donnie Darko (2001) Freddy Got Fingered (2001) The Brown Bunny (2003) The Room (2003) Fateful Findings (2013)
(133) Unsorted L'Atalante (1934) Children of Paradise (1945) It's a Wonderful Life (1946) Pather Panchali (1955) Marketa Lazarová (1967) The Conformist (1970) Celine and Julie Go Boating (1974) Cinema Paradiso (1988) Dead Man (1995) Life Is Beautiful (1997) Pi (1998) Being John Malkovich (1999) Adaptation. (2002) The Illusionist (2006) Synecdoche, New York (2008) Dogtooth (2009) Enter the Void (2009) Inception (2010) Rubber (2010) The Great Beauty (2013) Birdman (2014) A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence (2014) Inherent Vice (2014) Chef (2014) The Lobster (2015) The Big Short (2015) Swiss Army Man (2016)
(134) Home Invasion Home Alone (1990) Panic Room (2002) Borgman (2013) The Gift (2015) Don't Breathe (2016)
(135) Historical The Leopard (1963) A Man for All Seasons (1966) Quest for Fire (1981) The Last of the Mohicans (1992) Braveheart (1995)
(136) New Hollywood Bonnie and Clyde (1967) The Graduate (1967) Five Easy Pieces (1970) The Last Picture Show (1971) Harold and Maude (1971) Easy Rider (1969)
(137) Hayao Miyazaki Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind (1984) Castle in the Sky (1986) My Neighbor Totoro (1988) Kiki's Delivery Service (1989) Porco Rosso (1992) Princess Mononoke (1997) Spirited Away (2001) Howl's Moving Castle (2004) The Wind Rises (2013)
(138) Italian neorealism Rome, Open City (1945) Paisan (1946) Bicycle Thieves (1948) Stromboli (1950)
submitted by homocomp to movies [link] [comments]

Tartar - this video - Thoughts Please

https://youtu.be/_tfxJmF7fAk
This essay accompanies Marcia Ramalh’s video for Age of Disclosure’s YouTube channel
Video by Arjan Hartman
The video presents 400 images with the High Technology of Great Tartary, stolen by the Invaders and still in operation worldwide.
Full text from "Tartary Empire - Aether" video
“Aether is the material supposed to fill the region of the universe above the terrestrial sphere. In mythology, it was thought to be the pure essence that the gods breathed, filling the space where they lived, analogous to the air breathed by mortals”. (From Wikipedia)
“Aether”, the “5th element”, means the water that connects everything electromagnetically.
The pseudoscience calls Aether as “dark energy” and “dark matter”.
I Intro
All cities located at strategic points on Earth along rivers, seas, lakes and oceans were Star Fortress and had electromagnetic energy extracted from the ether.
The energy was captured through towers and obelisks and stored in the red and white striped power stations of the High Civilization called Tartary. They always had a fountain with water near them.
This civilization was destroyed in the 19-20 century through floods, energy weapons (DEW) and scheduled mass exterminations and the Earth was suddenly deserted by billions of people. All the architecture and technology of this superior civilization was stolen and passed into the hands of Parasites who created the current ignorant civilization.
This is the story of how a visit to the Berlin Zoo led to the discovery that its magical atmosphere is inherited from the star fortress that housed the city and how all world architecture to this date is designed to extract electromagnetic energy from the ether.
II Berlin Zoo
On the cloudy afternoon of May 27, 2018, Janey Benson visited the Berlin Zoological Garden and realized that there was something different in the air.
"The animals in this zoo are the happiest I have ever seen. I thought it was because they got more oxygen because Berlin is covered by trees, plants and flowers and all the trees are numbered and counted. But then I saw the spires were like those we see in mosques and like pre mudflood photos and I imagined that this was what you were talking about. Is it atmospheric energy? It is in that building that giraffes currently live. If it generated energy I do not know, but I am a witness of the extraordinary happiness that was there”.
"There is something in Berlin that is wonderful and I want to go back there. I want to breathe that air again”.
This is the testimony of the American Janey Benson, who may be associated with the recent past of the Tartar Arian (Tartary) civilization, inherited from the legendary Atlanteans (Titans).
In this civilization, architecture had the function of extracting properties of waves and resonances from the electromagnetic field, to harmonize, heal, prolong life and increase the stature of men, plants and animals.
When the Earth's energy grid was destroyed by the barbarians who came from the "Terra Incognita" (the self called "gods" of Olympus), the density crushed the Titans and threw them into the hell of Tartarus - the name given by “scholars” to the burning Tartary.
And the knowledge and history of the Tartar Aryan civilization was burned out and erased of the memory of many.
III Victory Column
The Berlin zoo visited by Janey gathers the most expressive collection of animal and vegetable species from around the world. There are 1,380 species, 20,200 animals and an Aquarium, surrounded by 35 hectares of vegetation.
The Zoo is within the Tiergarten park, situated opposite the Reichstag dome and has in its center the Victory Column, in granite studded with bronze ornaments. Large domes, towers and columns are always associated with ether energy production.
This is the top of the coil inside the Reichstag dome, protected by mirrors. The tip of the coil seems to have been made with the purest copper and is in the hall below the mirrored part. Its shape copy the top of the old power plants of the East. But this is little to explain the happiness that reigns in the park and throughout the city.
There is a more powerful reason. Berlin was one of the gigantic Star Fortress of the ancient and highly technological civilization of Tartary. This 1688 engraving shows that Berlin was a huge and mighty Star Fortress.
This kind of fortress was not built by normal men. It would require thousands of highly skilled men. And there were such strongholds all over the earth. In addition, the fortress "communicated" with each other to create the worldwide energy grid.
When the invaders who came from Terra Incognita destroyed the perfect electromagnetic grid and created cataclysms, the civilization of Tartary was annihilated and its defensive structures wrecked or were melted and petrified.
Star Fortress provided security, health and harmony for its inhabitants.
It is possible that some of the old magic is still present in the atmosphere of Berlin as in these postcards of 1896 and 1899 ?
At the Berlin zoo, visitors and animals are also given the benefit of the magic sound of the bells.
In the park there is a rare carillon installed at 42 meters high which houses 68 bells of 48 tons and is the fourth in the world in number of bells. Concerts in the park with the historic carillon take place every Sunday at 3 p.m., from May to September. The vibration of bronze, associated with the ethereal electromagnetic current, has a high harmonizing and healing power.
IV Hohenzollern
The carillon history dates back to the first kings of Prussia, Frederick I and II, of the Hohenzollern dynasty.
Wikipedia claims that the German zoo was "opened" in 1844 but on this date Germany did not exist and much less had central government. There was only one confederation with 22 small monarchies and 17 other states that spoke German.
The Tiergarten park and its palace belonged to the Tartary civilization. With the defeat of Tartary and the creation of Germany, the palace was demolished and the Reichstag was erected by the will of the character "Bismarck".
It is likely that Tartaria has designated Berlin Tiergarten to save almost extinct species, in a world that slowly came out of total chaos and sudden climate change. Janey Benson's observation of the numbered trees in Berlin Tiergarten park fits into this hypothesis.
Tiergarten may have been a magnificent Noah's Ark endowed with atmospheric energy, where all species were classified to be saved.
The building surrounded by eight minarets which Janey photographed in the Tiergarten and to which she ascribes the secret of such happiness, continues to secretly store atmospheric energy produced by Victory Column, associated with the Reichstag dome.
And what happens today in the central park of Berlin for the benefit of humans and animals, was carried out in the past throughout the world from the beginning of our Real History.
V Iron and Copper
The high civilization Tartar Aryan extracted electromagnetic energy from the ether through star fortress complexes with power stations, domes, towers, minarets, bridges and obelisks and used the very high thermal and electrical conductivity of copper.
From 7,000 years ago to the 1900s, Tartarian people mined Keweenaw copper at Michigan, US, to provide raw material for domes and coils throughout the world. Its fusion with tin created the bronze that allowed primitive Europe to enter into the modernity that had existed for a long time in territories of Tartary.
From the half of the 1900s, the ”Gray Men" would sent their agents to exterminate Tartarians in "New India" (North America), take their land and minerals and slaughter them and their livestock to feed the newly created industries of Chicago and transport the meat on the roads which would pave the way for the takeover of new territories and create distances that would encourage the oil industry, the use of the automobile and the need for currency expansion and creation of a financial system. But this is another story.
Copper has been mined since the beginning of human history. Venetians ("Phoenicians") mined copper in New World (America) and Cornwall. Copper ingots used in the Middle East and Europe complex were mined and molted in facilities in the Americas.
According to American Indian oral tradition, copper was mined by “red haired white-skinned ‘marine men’ who came from across the sea”. And mines of Almaden in Spain, Huancavelica in Peru and New Almaden in California, provided the mercury.
Wikipedia: “The earliest substantiated and dated evidence of metalworking in the Americas was the processing of copper in Wisconsin, near Lake Michigan. Copper was hammered until brittle then heated so it could be worked some more. This technology is dated to about 4000-5000 BCE. Ancient civilisations knew of seven metals: Iron, Tin, Lead, Copper, Mercury, Silver and Gold.
In the past, “alchemists developed sophisticated, powerful techniques to separate and purify metals” (Wikipedia)
Copper and tin was used extensively, even in helmets, to power plasma (DEW) weapons and to obtain wireless communication.
And iron foundries were the backbone of the world industry until they disappeared in the Great Catastrophe.
VI Coils
The electromagnetic energy was extracted and stored in toroid coils at the power plant summits, covered with copper, positioned below the towers.
When rotating inside coils, magnetic fields create electrical charges in a mercury vortex. Hindu energetic complexes exhibit this function at the top of their structures. “In a coil of multiple turns of wire, the magnetic field of the turns adds in the center of the coil, creating a strong field”, says Wikipedia.
"Coils" can still be seen at the top of the power supply centers in India. Manufactured History and the Invented Religions call these energy factories as ”temples."
Prambanan complex in Indonesia had originally 240 estações de energia in a concentric mandala layout
Power plants have metal hoops where the "toroidal coil" works. Perhaps the "mass dumper" of the Taipei Tower accumulates this function. Modern towers are already built with the domes themselves and they are positioned below the pole that stands up to contact with the ether. A lookout can distract visitors' attention on the tower's true architectural significance.
This metal sphere represents the favorite geometric object of the fictional character “Tesla”, reports Wikipedia. And so it is displayed in a museum in Belgrade with the ashes of the pseudo-inventor. The dark eminences that created the Tesla myth as well as a long list of many other, see themselves as very intelligent and with a great sense of humor. And they appreciate leaving some clues of their frauds in the most unforeseen places.
The star fortress in Haiti, Taj Mahal, Hagia Sofia, Pantheon or Tower of Jewels were production plants and distribution of atmospheric energy, as well as thousands of “cathedrals”, “temples” and palaces around the world.
The original pyramids of Egypt and other places may have played an even more important role in electromagnetic energy production and for this they were the first to be neutralized.
Ancient pyramids and star fortress were so strong and powerful that many needed to be submerged like the Buhen fortress in Egypt, currently at the bottom of Nassar Lake, in one of the largest floods ever made in the world (1958). Next to it was an old copper factory and a city with 100 thousand inhabitants.
Pyramid-shaped power stations were called "tombs of pharaohs" and covered by sand, water, ice or vegetation such as the pyramids of the Faroe Islands, Antarctica, Bosnia, Russia and China.
VII Skyscrapers
But this is the past. Today the atmospheric energy is extracted by skyscrapers like the Petronas, Taipei, Burj Khalifa, by towers on top of hills, roofs of buildings or through ”Radio and TV broadcast towers" such as Ostankino Tower, Oriental Pearl, Jin Mao, Shanghai or Tianjin. And this energy is no longer free or clean, besides being expensive.
Skyscrapers are modern power plants and work in conjunction with metal structures of bridges whose iron is in contact with water and has spheres that may contain minicoils and mercury in the upper part.
The Empire State and the Manhattan Bridge were built by the Tartarians long before 1900. Just like the Tour Eiffel. By 1953, at least, the Invading Parasites had built nothing in cities around the world. Just destroyed. All buildings erected until the 1950’s belong to the Tartary civilization. It was only from the 1960’s that poor and ugly buildings-crates of the new civilization would begin to be erected.
Photographs that purport to show the construction of the Empire State Building are false and are nothing more than photomontages overlapping high quality glass negatives with photos of some wood boards and false workers in the foreground.
Skyscrapers are modern powerhouses. When Tartarian plans to erect the Empire State Building began to be drawn, the goal was to capture enough energy to illuminate Lake Ontario, Vermont, Buffalo, Albany, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, and Connecticut. This objective is registered on the aluminum plate in the hall of the building built by the Tartary civilization.
In the Chrysler building, Wikipedia expressly points out to 16 points on the 24th floor, which it calls "pineapples", where the mercury would be stored.
Buildings built by Tartary around the world continue to draw atmospheric energy to the invaders until today.
Invaders copied old technology, such as this recent Las Vegas building whose dome produces power to 4,000 apartments and to a fountain with dancing waters, synchronized with lights and music.
Tartary's power plants and buildings were built in granite and geopolymer concrete because they become more resistant with the passage of time and has the superconducting quartz crystal in its composition.
Here are some power station domes working associated with obelisks, minarets and pinnacles in granite and geopolymeric concrete, with columns and ornaments in iron, for extraction of electromagnetic energy.
Electromagnetism produces gigantic invisible "waves" of energy. Transmitting towers receive and emit the electric field to considerable distances.
To transmit wireless electricity as in the past, to more and more extensive regions and with more users, the towers are getting higher.
Towers like these can extract atmospheric energy to feed entire countries.
It is possible that one of the reasons for the WTC's demolition in 9/11 was the need to expand energy extraction technology.
Everyone remembers the huge antenna needle on top of one of the towers being sprayed into the air. WTC towers were obsolete and so they fell to the ground. The demolition dust caused 70,000 cases of cancer. Insurers paid $ 4.55 billion for the old towers' pulverization. The new antenna looks much more powerful.
“An electromagnetic coil is an electrical conductor such as a wire in the shape of a coil, spiral or helix. Either an electric current is passed through the wire of the coil to generate a magnetic field, or conversely an external time-varying magnetic field through the interior of the coil generates an EMF (voltage) in the conductor”. (Wikipedia)
VIII Energy worldwide
All over the world the technology of energy extraction through the atmosphere still works perfectly in castles, buildings, palaces, greenhouses, lighthouses, kiosks, fountains, “mosques”, fortresses, towers, bridges and “cathedrals” that kept the old technological apparatus intact.
This apparatus includes elaborate roof grids and small window-like openings, metal ornaments in the corners of buildings, pointed antennae with ornaments or balls with mercury, metals embedded in masonry and geopolymer concrete, jars containing mercury, cornices, spires, roofs with copper ornaments and structural foundations in iron, among others.
This apparatus is also present in the current skyscrapers.
IX The Architecture to extract energy
The world architecture for electromagnetic energy extraction derives entirely from the High Civilization Tartar Arian. It is characterized by the use of arch openings, columns, domes and towers. In addition to details such as rose windows and muqarnas, symbols of the vibration of electromagnetic energy, which acts on molecules and changes the behavior of cells.
Formerly these waves could act in healing, levitation and transport, besides provoking feelings like harmony and euphoria. This energy can now being used in another way.
The architecture of the Tartary undergoes slight modifications and influences according to the local characteristics of climate, culture and material resources but maintains the basic principles throughout the world.
The Fake History called the Tartary architecture as ”Moorish revival” or “Mauresque” and “Islamic”. And also “Colonial”, “Medieval”, “Neoclassical”, “Baroque”, “Romanesque”, “Gothic”, “Beaux Arts”, “Eclectic”, “Tudor”, “Renaissance”, “Palladian”, “Richardsonian Romanesque”, “Chicago School” or “Victorian”. And labeled them as fashionable styles, to hide the old and true function of its columns, arched openings, pinnacles, rose windows, naves ornamented with iron columns, towers, and domes.
In addition to having cut the ends of the pinnacles in the photographs or add crosses that did not exist before.
X War
After the defeat of the Tartary, all the ancient buildings "destroyed by wars" were miraculously "rebuilt" from the years "1870s" by nonexistent architects whose portraits are a pastiche.
Fantasies like "was destroyed by fire in 1895 and rebuilt in 1901" are written to hide the advanced and superior technology present in the constructions of Tartary long before the 9th century.
Some wars, bombings, or great fires of the past may be historical falsehoods, repeated in 3 different layers like 1776, 1812 and 1870s. In Dresden, for example, there would have been a battle in 1813, revolts that damaged the city in 1848 and 1863, and severe bombing in February 1945. According to Official History, 90% of the city center was destroyed. But this is not entirely true. The main buildings of the old citadel were spared.
There was a selective bombing that targeted residential dwellings as well as factories and military facilities. Dresden was a huge Star Fortress and capital of the Free State of Saxony, which did not obey to the “Pope” and to the new emperors.
The region had been entirely colonized by Slavs and housed over 600,000 war refugees whom the Invaders had an interest in exterminating. Dresden was an important economic center, with 127 factories and military facilities that could house 20,000 people.
The city's skyline continues exactly as it was in the 1800s and probably still draws energy from the ether. But the ancient inhabitants were gone to give place to the invaders.
This building in Dresden, for example, is a huge Tartarian power station, transformed into a mosque by Gray Men acting on behalf of Invading Parasites. Even so, it still retains the red and white colors of Tartary that designated the main function of these structures.
Tartary knew that his enemy was ruthless and terrible and for this they protected their cities throughout the world with immense Star Fortress and great walls. But it was defeated by energy weapons (DEW) and waves of 300 meters of glacial waters that swept the continents and submerged the fortresses.
The enemy was stronger and could have simply destroyed the entire Earth. But he only wanted to exterminate billions of humans to take ownership of his lands, technology, fortunes, and palaces.
The architecture of Tartary used the red color of bricks and clear stripes, to designate power stations and associated structures. Like the station of St Pancras in London, which belonged to the civilization of Tartary and by it was built.
In some regions they could also be striped in black, green or brown. And have a bronze griffin on the roof, the animal symbol of Tartary.
In Cairo, this power station was built in 876, according to Wikipedia. It is the largest and oldest in Egypt, in its original form.
All Tartary power stations, small and large, had pipe organs to harmonize and heal the population through sound waves, what is now known as "cymatics". For this reason, they immediately passed into the hands of the Invaders Parasites after the defeat of Tartary. And so the Presbyterian, Catholic, Anglican, synagogue, mosque temples and churches were born.
"Gods" of Olympus who invaded Earth and falsified History, transformed the powerful energy stations of Tartary into mausoleums, "tombs", monasteries, cloisters, abbeys, synagogues and churches of religions invented in the 20th century. And royal palaces in mosques. Or destroyed them.
The enemy also interrupted the astronomical clocks of Tartary because they used the geocentric model to represent the solar system. In the Tartarian astronomical clocks, the earth was at the center of the solar system. These clocks were complex calculating machines. They used terms like "computus" and to operate them sophisticated mathematical knowledge was required.The invaders invented the heliocentric model and the Copernicus character, among many others, to be able to recreate the history of humanity and erase traces of their recent crimes and destruction of the great civilization of Tartary.
Throughout the world, invading forces that defeated Tartaria appropriated their palaces and red power stations and turned it into universities, museums, theaters, banks, prefectures, chambers of commerce, stock exchange, churches, high school, courts, banks, post offices, libraries, opera theaters, biomedical research institutes, casinos and tourist attraction, as well as cathedrals, synagogues and churches.
And they continue to paint the structures that extract energy from the ether with the same colors as Tartary.
This was the main power station in the whole Europe, located in Budapest, Hungary.
And this is the main power station of Antwerp, Belgium. They were transformed into synagoges by the forces that destroyed Tartary.
And keep destroying.
XII Tartary was the whole world
Asia, Africa, Europe, Oceania and the Americas were part of a single High Civilization and had the architecture focused on the extraction of electromagnetic energy.
Ottoman Empire, Byzantine Empire, Ross Empire or Great Tartary. Many names for the civilization present both in the throne room of the Grand Kremlin Palace in Moscow and in the Library of Congress in Washington.
Tartary was the whole world. And continues to be. And the technology of electromagnetic energy extraction is the same to 7000 years.
This is attested by the Gothic towers, Hindu and Chinese “pagodas” of the 11th century, the African clay “mosque”, the "Presbyterian Church" in Buffalo (NY), the pinnacle studded with metal staples of the 11th century complex of Zamora, the Kantojiu nine spires or the Lingxiao roofs design whose drawings are perfectly reproduced in the contemporary Jin Mao Tower in Shanghai.
However, this energy is not always as beneficial as the Tiergarten park in Berlin.
submitted by iharmonious to Retconned [link] [comments]

My Fallout Vault Ideas

I know that there is posts for making vault ideas already, but i wanted to list some of my own
comment on them if you want and please suggest some ideas for new ones.

Background to my Vaults

One of the great minds of vault-tec is Alexander Markusburg, who created a lot more gecks then vault-tec ever said they made. Including 5 'Super Gecks', powerful enough to make the others Alexander made worthless. Afraid and worried for the world, he went and with numerous allies created many more vaults all over the world, known as the A-G vaults. He placed his super gecks in 5 special vaults under 5 certain cities. Soon he went into his private vault under the Berlin wall, known as the Berlin Vault. Inside is him, who created tons of bodies for himself and froze his old one, His head scientists who also have a few clone bodies, and numerous people brought in to help test his ideas, creations, and more. However one more thing,....due to the idea of magic from the dunwich locations in fallout, he was both a scientist, and a mage.
Note: Alexander is not op because, well....you could disable all of his clones and then kill him easily so....yea, he is still human, just a smart one who made things he couldn't trust in anyone's hands. Also unlike Vault Tec, Alexander didn't want to experiment too much, and thus only the F and G vaults are the ones where more experiments take place, due how they were made by some scientists that joined him from Vault Tec, not trusting them either.
Note 2: The Gun Runners are in a sense a company in the wasteland, thus if there is a base, and there is traders, you can still get companies.
Note 3: Vaults A-E all are mostly harmless, with more less chaotic situations and experiments
Note 4: I may not fit all of them here, so the most i will go to is to the 90th or 100th vault
Note 5: There is a lot of character i will make for each vault, if you want a character to be featured in one of the A-G vaults say so
Note 6: A mini geck is bascally a smaller portable geck with a few strong yet hard to recharge charges, once it's all used up, it breaks down.

The 5 Super Geck Vaults

The A Vaults (Scattered all over the world, and Alexander Jokes he placed one on the moon)

The B Vaults (Mostly North America, and the Caribbean)

The C Vaults (Mostly in Asia and Oceania)

The D Vaults (Mostly in South and Centural America as well as Africa and the Middle East)

The E Vaults (Mostly in Europe)

The F Vaults (aka when Alexander's vaults ended, and his fellow scientists vaults started afther these, alexander pulled the plug fully on vault building but 32 more scientists still went out and made some. All are near the water)

The G Vaults (only 32, made in the last few years before the bombs started falling across the world, made by the Lucky 32 scientists, as each made one of the vaults. All are under a existing building)

submitted by Gmknewday1 to Fallout [link] [comments]

Test

Much like Frankenstein's famous monster, the Dark Universe is probably doomed to be remembered as a failed experiment cobbled together from spare parts, and a cautionary tale about the perils of playing God. As Universal Pictures found out the hard way: creating a universe is really hard, even if that universe happens to be fictional.
At best, Dracula Untold and The Mummy were just a pair of bland, forgettable fantasy films with a few neat ideas thrown in. At worst, they embody the most deplorable excesses of Hollywood's love affair with franchises and reboots, and they serve as a reminder that a "cinematic universe" isn't a magic bullet that guarantees massive success.
In case you forgot: Dracula Untold bombed so hard that the studio retroactively exiled it from the franchise (and they don't even like to admit that it was ever part of a franchise), and The Mummy put the name of the franchise in its opening credits before the franchise was even established.
But was this series always doomed to failure, or was it just flawed in its execution? Call me crazy, but I think there was the kernel of a great series in both of those movies, even as disappointing as they were.
A Dracula movie set in the Middle Ages, with historical details about the real Vlad Dracula thrown in? Awesome! A Mummy movie that's also a spy thriller, where Tom Cruise plays an undead superhero? Okay, that was stupid... But that room full of classic monster Easter Eggs was pretty cool, right?
So what happened? In short: a lot of things. Dracula Untold had a promising story, but I really think its premise ran into a big problem:
Origin stories are extremely hard to do well.
They're definitely not impossible (the rules of storytelling are more like guidelines, after all), but not every character can be improved with a definitive origin story.
It's one thing to make a feature-length origin story about an iconic hero like James Bond or Batman, since they're sympathetic characters whom we're meant to identify with. For anybody who's ever daydreamed about being a superhero or a secret agent, those fantasies instantly become a lot more vivid when we see a hero's human side, and we learn how they came to be; once we see that our heroes aren't so different from us, it's easier to imagine that we could be like them.
Monsters, though? Monsters are a different story. While most great villains have a human side, they usually become iconic because they embody something primal and archetypal that we find scary, and they derive their power from their mystery.
Moviegoers of the 1960s loved Ernst Stavro Blofeld because he embodied everything that they found scary about dictators on the far side of the Iron Curtain. Comic book fans love the Joker because he's the living embodiment of chaos, and he represents everything that we find scary about crime. And supernatural villains like Maleficent, the Wicked Witch of the West, and—yes—Dracula embody everything that we find scary about the occult.
That's probably why most James Bond fans loved it when Casino Royale explored Bond's origins, but hated it when Spectre tried to do the same for Blofeld. It's also probably why Batman fans loved it when Batman Begins explained how Bruce Wayne became Batman, but didn't mind that The Dark Knight explained almost nothing about the Joker. And it's probably why Maleficent and Oz the Great and Powerful got such lukewarm receptions when they tried to explain how Maleficent and the Wicked Witch became evil. When you explain too much about an iconic villain, you run the risk of robbing them of their mystique.
(That's also why I'm not so optimistic about the upcoming Joker origin movie, though I'll wait until it comes out before I criticize it)
The thing is, though...a prequel doesn't necessarily have to be an origin story. It's possible to shed some light on a character's past without devoting a whole story to explaining how they became the way they are. Case in point: compare the movie Hannibal Rising to the TV series Hannibal. They're both prequels to the Hannibal Lecter saga, but one was a critically panned box-office bomb, and the other was a critically praised cult classic with a devoted fandom. Why? There are a lot of reasons why—but for starters, one was devoted to "explaining" how Lecter became Lecter, and the other actually gives Lecter a chance to be Lecter.
Instead of just answering every single question about Lecter's past, Hannibal devotes its creative energy to being a genuinely solid crime drama with a strong dose of gothic horror, and it actually manages to stand on its own alongside The Silence of the Lambs and Red Dragon without being entirely defined by either of them. In a perfect world, that's the sort of prequel that Dracula Untold should have been: a solid supernatural horror story set in the Middle Ages, which could paved the way for the original Dracula without being entirely defined by it.
But what if we actually had gotten a Dracula prequel like that? And what if we had gotten a Mummy movie that logically built on its plot points, and set up the framework of a franchise without shoving it down our throats? And what if we had gotten, say, a Frankenstein movie and a Wolf Man movie that built on both of them, and set up an epic "monster mash" in the vein of Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man or House of Dracula? What might those movies have looked like?
Well...
Dracula: Untold (2014)
Setting: Transylvania, 1473
As our movie opens, we're introduced to our protagonist: a handsome, dark-haired Prince who rules over a vast swath of territories in Eastern Europe, including Transylvania. A lifelong soldier, he's led his people to victory in dozens of battles, he always wears a suit of armor, and he can wield a sword as well as any of his loyal knights. If it helps, you can imagine imagine Luke Evans playing him.
But protagonist isn't Vlad Tepes (the man better known as "Dracula", or "Vlad the Impaler"). Instead, he's a different historical monarch: Matthias Corvinus, the King of Hungary. As any Dracula fan will tell you, Matthias Corvinus was arguably the single most important figure in the historical Dracula's life; a revered monarch who became legendary for his prowess in battle and his patronage of the arts, he was alternately an ally and rival of Prince Vlad of Wallachia, who fought alongside him against the Ottoman Empire. Here, Matthias is our hero, and Dracula is the villain of the story—as he should be.
Over the course of his three decades on the throne, Matthias has seen the world change, not always for the better. It's been twenty years since the great city of Constantinople fell to the Ottoman sultan Mehmed II, spelling the end of the last vestiges of the Roman Empire. As the sultan's power grows, the lords and princes of Christian Europe fear that the religion of Islam will soon dominate the West. While all of this plays out, rumors spread of strange creatures hiding in the shadowy lands east of the Carpathian Mountains, where the brutal prince Vlad—called "Dracula", or "Son of the Beast"—holds sway over the kingdom of Wallachia.
While Mehmed's armies grow ever closer to the borders of Matthias' kingdom, Matthias answers a call for help from the province of Transylvania, where strange and terrible things are afoot. The corpses of peasants are turning up in the woods, completely drained of their blood; entire villages are vanishing without explanation; massive swarms of bats can be seen flying over the countryside in the dead of night; hunters regularly encounter enormous wolf-like creatures, which walk on two legs like men. Matthias realizes that his kingdom is falling under the sway of evil forces, and he must confront them.
Against the advice of his men, Matthias decides to lead a party of knights across the Carpathian Mountains to investigate the rash of mysterious deaths, knowing that his journey will lead him into the heart of Wallachia. As he and his men travel farther and farther from home, they find themselves fighting for their lives against ferocious werewolves and hostile villagers, and they soon realize why so many villagers are vanishing: someone is turning them into mindless vampires, and they're leaving their homes to seek fresh blood. After one deadly confrontation with a swarm of vampires, Matthias is forced to behead one of his own knights to prevent him from becoming one of them, and a local apothecary offers him some advice on how to kill a vampire.
After explaining how to ward off vampires with stakes and crucifixes, the apothecary tells Matthias the disturbing tale of Prince Vlad, who hasn't been seen outside of his castle in months. She explains that she was once a servant in the castle, but fled for her life after she witnessed Vlad drinking blood from a chalice in a disturbing occult ritual. She believes that the Prince has become a vampire, and that he has sworn allegiance to Lucifer in exchange for eternal life. Though Matthias doubts her story about Vlad being in league with Lucifer, he knows that the vampires must have a master, and believes that it might be Vlad.
But the apothecary's warning comes too late: Matthias and his party are ambushed and captured by vampires, who take them to Prince Vlad's castle. When Matthias awakes, he finds himself in chains in Vlad's throne room, and Vlad—played by Charles Dance—formally introduces himself. He informs Matthias that he no longer answers to his old name, and is now only "Dracula". With that, Matthias is forced to watch helplessly as Dracula fatally impales his comrades on wooden stakes, and Dracula's vampire servants eagerly gather their blood in a chalice and present it to their master. As Dracula sips from his chalice, he informs Matthias that the apothecary's story was true: he really is a servant of Lucifer. And now that he has a noble-born prince as a captive, he plans to sacrifice him to Lucifer, which will grant him enough power to make him unstoppable.
While Dracula prepares the sacrifice ritual, he throws Matthias into his dungeon to await his fate. But with quick thinking and a little bit of luck, Matthias manages to escape after one of Dracula's brides disobeys her master's orders and sneaks into the dungeons to take some of Matthias' blood for herself. Heeding the apothecary's advice, he manages to fight his way through legions of vampires, and rushes back to Dracula's throne room to confront him. Just as he does, Dracula speaks the incantation to summon his master Lucifer, and Matthias finds himself staring through a fiery portal into Hell—where he sees Lucifer staring right back at him.
Just at that moment, salvation arrives: the sultan's army is on the march, and they've reached Dracula's castle. As Matthias picks up his sword and engages Dracula in battle, a barrage of cannon-fire rings out, and the Ottoman army lays siege to the castle. Little by little, the castle begins to crumble, and Dracula falls into the dungeons, where he's buried under a pile of stone rubble. As the castle's walls fall, Matthias makes his escape and sets off for home.
Days later, as Matthias lays down to sleep beside his wife, he has a disturbing dream about Dracula—who is trapped in the dungeons of his ruined castle, but very much alive. In his dream, Dracula assures him that he will rise again, and he reminds Matthias that he's immortal; the next time he threatens the people of Transylvania, Matthias may not be alive to stop him...
The Mummy: Unconquered (2016)
Setting: Egypt, 1798
Our story picks up more than 300 years after the sultan's troops destroyed Castle Dracula. The year is 1798, and the Ottoman Empire still rules over much of Eastern Europe and the Middle East—including Egypt, where the Mamluk rulers Mourad and Ibrahim swear fealty to the sultan. After decades of war and revolutionary upheaval in Europe, rumors spread of an ambitious Corsican military officer, who has risen through the ranks of the French Army to become one of the most feared men on the Continent. Now, with an unparalleled fighting force at his command, he plans to set his sights on Egypt. His name? Napoleon Bonaparte.
Our protagonist is a young Egyptian man named Salim, who reluctantly answers the call to enlist in the Egyptian Army as Napoleon's forces march from Alexandria and make their move on Cairo. He is forced to leave his fiancee, Yasmin, whose father Mustafa is a renowned scholar who manages a library in Cairo. As he fights with the Egyptian Army in the Battle of the Pyramids, he narrowly escapes with his life as the French Army massacres his friends and comrades, and takes hundreds of Egyptian prisoners. Unbeknownst to him, though, Napoleon has more than conquest on his mind; he's looking for the long-lost Temple of Set, which supposedly houses a fabled ceremonial dagger that can make its bearer unstoppable in battle. With the Egyptian forces scattered, he and his army strike out into the desert to seek out the temple. One of his commanders is a certain German baron, whose name will become important later.
Eventually, Napoleon finds his way to the temple, which is half-buried in the desert sands, and nearly inaccessible. But against all odds, he fights his way to the heart of the temple and takes the dagger, though he begins to have his doubts about whether it will really bring him the power that he seeks. As he leaves the temple, he doesn't notice that something is stirring in a stone sarcophagus...
Exhausted from battle, Salim manages to make his way back to Yasmin and her father in Cairo, just as Napoleon's forces swarm the streets. Together, they plan to flee the city before more soldiers arrive, but Mustafa refuses to go with them, insisting that he can't leave his library. Before they can make their escape, the German baron forces his way into Mustafa's library and threatens him at knife-point. He tells him that Napoleon has found the dagger in the Temple of Set, but he suspects that there is a secret to claiming its power—and he believes that he'll find that secret in one of the books in Mustafa's library. Visibly terrified, Mustafa insists that there is no such secret, but he tells the baron that he must return the dagger to the temple.
"The Dagger of Set is no key to power—it's a safeguard against a great evil. There are shadowy forces lurking in the Temple of Set, and the dagger is the only thing keeping them back! Once it's removed..."
But his warning comes too late: a monstrous horde of giant scarabs swarms the city of Cairo, attacking and devouring everyone in their path. Salim and co. manage to escape from the baron, and they take shelter in the cellar of Mustafa's library. As they hide from the rampaging insects, Mustafa explains the full story of the Temple of Set.
In his younger days, Mustafa was a scholar in the court of the sultan, and he had the opportunity to learn many secrets in his palace library. While there, he learned the story of Imhotep, an infamous high priest from the New Kingdom of Egypt who made a pact with the evil god Set in exchange for eternal life and everlasting power. It's said that the Pharaoh had Imhotep mummified alive and sealed in his own temple when he grew too powerful, and he placed the enchanted dagger in the temple to prevent him from leaving. For centuries, the Temple of Set has remained abandoned, and Imhotep has remained dormant—but he's as alive as ever, and only needs an opportunity to free himself. To seal him back in his prison, the dagger must be returned to its rightful place in the temple
"Over 300 years ago, the sultan's army laid siege to a castle in the Carpathian Mountains. Something evil dwelt in its foundations, and they dared not set it free. There are places in the world where evil gathers like a deadly plague, awaiting the chance to spread. That castle was one such place. The Temple of Set is another."
Back in the Temple of Set, Imhotep—a grotesque, withered figure wrapped in bandages—rises from his sarcophagus and summons a massive army of reanimated corpses. As Imhotep and his army march on Cairo together, the scarabs continue to swarm the city, and Salim and Yasmin fight to survive as they look for the missing dagger. When Napoleon's forces spot the army of corpses marching through the desert, they gather in formation to fight them off, and Salim takes the opportunity to steal the dagger from Napoleon's camp. In a massive battle, Napoleon and the baron lead a cavalry charge against Imhotep's forces, distracting them just long enough for Salim and Yasmin to make their way to the temple to return the dagger.
In the climax, Yasmin and Salim infiltrate the Temple of Set and fight their way to the center of the massive structure while Imhotep attempts to chase them down. Moments before they return the dagger to its resting place, they have a blood-curdling encounter with Set himself, whom Imhotep has summoned as a witness to his return. As Set taunts our heroes, his face changes shape for one brief moment, and becomes the face of Lucifer; though the moment is fleeting, it instantly becomes clear that Set and Lucifer are the same being—meaning that Imhotep and Dracula are in thrall to the same master.
Against all odds, they manage to return the dagger just before Imhotep closes in on them. Imhotep cries out to his master Set to save him, but the god turns his back on him, coldly telling him that he's not worthy of his power if he can be foiled by a pair of lowly mortals. Meanwhile, Imhotep's undead soldiers crumble into dust as Napoleon's army holds them off. When the dust settles, the baron has been grievously injured in the fighting, and has lost his right leg.
With that, Salim and Yasmin settle down in Cairo to start a family together. Though Imhotep has been defeated, Napoleon's forces remain in Egypt, and Salim and Yasmin must face the harsh reality of living under foreign occupation. In the final scene, Napoleon sends the injured baron back to Germany for medical treatment, and thanks him for his fine service as he bids him farewell.
"You've fought well. Travel safely, Baron Von Frankenstein..."
Frankenstein: Unchained (2018)
Setting: Germany, 1820
A little over twenty years after Imhotep and his undead army were defeated in Egypt, the German nobleman Alphonse Von Frankenstein—a battle-hardened veteran of the Napoleonic Wars—has settled down and started a family. Haunted by his experiences in Egypt (which he refuses to speak about), he is known for his cold demeanor, and his children Victor and Elizabeth often have a strained relationship with him. Their relationship becomes even more difficult when Alphonse's wife Caroline suddenly dies of scarlet fever when Victor is just a child, causing Alphonse to become a chronically depressed recluse. A bookish child, Victor seeks solace in scientific texts, and soon becomes obsessed with esoteric disciplines like alchemy and mysticism; haunted by the loss of his mother, he is determined to find a way to conquer death through science, and believes that it might be possible to create life in a laboratory.
Though Elizabeth becomes concerned about her brother's mental state, Victor soon proves himself as a science prodigy, and he eventually receives an exclusive invitation to study medicine at Ingolstadt University, a prestigious German university with a rather ghoulish reputation. Though no one has ever been able to prove it, it's rumored that the students and faculty at Ingolstadt often perform grotesque experiments on live human test subjects. Supposedly, some of the students have even done research on how to resurrect the dead.
While studying at Ingolstadt, Victor soon becomes intrigued by the sprawling university and its many hidden places. As he soon learns, the school is also home to a highly exclusive secret society known as "Prodigium", whose members have access to the most jealously guarded texts and research in the school's inner sanctum. Victor exhaustively pursues his studies in science and medicine, and he finally gets his chance to join the ranks of Prodigium when his wealthy roommate Igor Waldman reveals that he is a member, and he tells Victor that he has been nominated for membership. Ecstatic, Victor accompanies Igor to attend Prodigium's initiation ritual on the night of a full moon, and he's finally given access to the secret library at the heart of Ingolstadt.
As the assembled members of Prodigium don hooded cloaks and gather around a circle of candles surrounding a mirror, Victor suddenly realizes—to his utter horror—that the group is actually an occult sect, and they regularly gather in the library for pagan rites and rituals. When the initiation ritual commences, the group begins chanting a prayer to a being known as "The Dark One", and they call Victor forward to join in. When he does, a mysterious black-eyed figure appears in the mirror and beckons to him; as he looks on, the figure's face changes, first becoming the face of Lucifer, then the face of Set. As Victor looks around at his surroundings, he realizes that the room is filled with antique art, including a set of Egyptian hieroglyphs depicting Imhotep, and an oil portrait of Dracula. Though Victor is terrified by all that he sees, Igor convinces him to stay, telling him that Prodigium has the resources to make his dreams a reality.
"I know that you have potential, Victor. You want to create life. Some might call you mad, but we understand. The power to create life shouldn't belong to God alone. You can lead the way into a new age. We'll be right behind you!"
Victor accepts his membership in Prodigium, giving him access to the laboratory in Ingolstadt's inner sanctum—where he has a fully stocked vault of chemicals and scientific equipment at his disposal, along with all of the cadavers and preserved organs that he could ever need. As he begins to experiment on human bodies, Igor moves into the lab to assist him, and he subtly encourages Victor when he begins to have doubts about the ethics of his work. Finally, many months later, Victor manages to piece together a complete human specimen from preserved body parts, and he and Igor prepare to use a lightning storm to bring the specimen to life. As the Creature comes to life on the laboratory slab, Victor—overcome with emotion—names it "Adam", reminded of the story of the Garden of Eden. But Igor rebukes Victor for invoking the Bible, and tells him that he shouldn't get too attached to the Creature. With that, the other members of Prodigium appear and drag the Creature into the crypts beneath the laboratory.
It turns out that Victor was always just a pawn in Prodigium's ultimate plan: creating a living vessel for their master, "The Dark One", that will allow him to cross into the mortal world and rule over humanity. Since the Creature is an artificially created being, he has no soul, making his body the perfect empty vessel for the Dark One's soul. Now that Victor's experiment has succeeded, they have only to wait until the next full moon to perform the summoning ritual.
Against all odds, the Creature successfully manages to escape from the crypts, and he flees into the Bavarian countryside. As Igor and his friends leave the university to hunt him down, Victor sets out to find the Creature before Prodigium does, determined to save him. Fortunately, he finds the Creature taking refuge in a local farmhouse, and he comforts him and brings him food. As the Creature takes shelter, Victor tells him that his true name is "Adam", and he promises that he won't let Prodigium take him. To his surprise, the Creature—Adam—speaks to him, revealing that he's intelligent and capable of understanding human speech. As they take the time to get to know each other, Victor resolves to smuggle him out of the country and take him where Prodigium can't hurt him.
Their moment of peace turns out to be fleeting; some of the local villagers are in league with Prodigium, and they tip Igor off about Victor's location. As Prodigium closes in, Adam fights back, revealing his superhuman strength as he kills six of Igor's goons with his bare hands. Finally, Victor and Adam manage to board a stagecoach, and a frantic chase ensues as they race through the countryside. After several days on the run, they manage to make it to the port of Hamburg, where Victor hopes to find Adam safe passage on a steamship. Unfortunately, Prodigium manages to head them off.
In a climactic final standoff with Igor, Victor sacrifices his life to save Adam as he boards his ship. As the ship pulls away from the port, Adam watches helplessly as his creator dies, and he promises that he'll make his sacrifice a worthy one.
In the final scene, back at the Frankenstein family estate, Elizabeth receives a letter written in handwriting that she doesn't recognize. As she reads it, she breaks down in tears as she learns that her beloved brother Victor has died, but the anonymous sender assures her that he died a noble man.
To her surprise, the letter doesn't come with a return address. As the sender cryptically remarks: "It's best that nobody find me..."
The Wolf Man: Untamed (2020)
Setting: America, 1862
A little over 40 years after the death of Victor Frankenstein, the United States has been split in two by the American Civil War, dividing many American families in the heartland. One such family is the Talbots, a family of poor farmers in rural Kansas, who find themselves caught in the middle of a clash between rival pro-slavery and anti-slavery factions.
One fateful day in 1856, 15 year-old Lawrence Talbot is forced to watch helplessly as his father John Talbot is brutally executed by marauders after he's discovered sheltering slaves. Though he never learns the name of his father's killer, he remembers just one detail about the man: he was carrying a distinctive black walking stick with a silver wolf's head on the handle. Six years later, with the war in full-swing, he reluctantly joins the Union Army, and finds himself deployed to Tennessee to fight the Confederates at Shiloh.
During a frenzied exchange of gunfire, Lawrence suddenly recognizes one of the soldiers in the Confederate Army, and realizes—much to his horror—that it's the marauder who killed his father. Six years after killing John Talbot, the man has risen up the ranks of the Confederate Army, and he is now a decorated lieutenant in the service of Colonel Nathan Bedford Forrest. Though he initially doubts his eyes, Lawrence's suspicions are confirmed when his comrades are called to pursue the retreating Confederates, and he discovers the black walking stick abandoned in the mud, complete with the distinctive wolf's head.
As Talbot and his comrades march through the war-torn countryside, they're eventually caught in a Confederate ambush, forcing Talbot and some of his friends to escape into a nearby forest. Fleeing deeper and deeper into the shadowed woods, they find themselves hopelessly lost when night falls. Before long, they hear a strange growling and snarling in the darkness—the telltale sounds of a wolf on the prowl. One by one, Talbot's companions are dragged off into the woods as the wolf hunts them down, and Talbot desperately tries to flee as he hears them being torn to shreds. He runs as fast as his legs will take him, but he can't outrun the wolf, and he passes out as it pounces on him from behind.
To his surprise, Talbot wakes up in a medical tent in a Confederate prison camp, and finds a surgeon tending to his wounds. The surgeon tells him that the Confederates found in the forest, the sole survivor of an apparent wolf attack. While all of his friends were mangled beyond recognition, Talbot got off with just a bite in the leg, and the wolf apparently left him before it could inflict further injuries.
Though the surgeon mends Talbot's leg wound, he tells Talbot that he has been taken as a prisoner of war, and he'll be held in the camp until further notice. Later, when a Confederate officer comes to interrogate him, Talbot learns that the black walking stick was confiscated during his capture; it turns out that its owner is Lieutenant Paul Montford, a well-known officer in the Tennessee Cavalry.
For days, Talbot languishes in the prison camp, growing progressively more angry at his captors as he endures repeated physical abuse and subsists on meager prison rations. Still, he vows to keep going, knowing that his father's killer is still out there.
Then a full moon rises...
As he watches the full moon rise over the countryside, Talbot suddenly feels thick hair growing all over his body, he feels his teeth growing longer and sharper, and he feels his hands and feet becoming razor-clawed paws. Overcome by feral rage, he lets out a mighty howl as he rips off the door of his holding pen. Roaring and snarling, he charges at the Confederate guards as they surround him and open fire, and he effortlessly tears through their ranks, biting and slashing at every soldier that dares cross him.
As the Rebels and the Union prisoners flee in terror, Talbot finally manages to fight his way to the officer who interrogated him. Pinning the helpless man to the ground, he snatches the black walking stick out of his hand. As he holds it in front of him, he snarls a single word:
"WHERE?!"
Terrified, the officer replies "Corinth Road!", and Talbot leaves him alive as he bounds off into the distance toward Corinth Road.
Sure enough, Montford and his men are making camp upcountry, near Corinth Road. As Talbot makes his way to the camp, the sun eventually rises, restoring his human form. Still, he charges forward, determined to kill Montford at all costs.
With his clothes shredded by his transformation, Talbot creeps into the camp when night falls again, and he manages to steal a spare Confederate uniform from a sleeping soldier's pack. In disguise, he sneaks into Montford's tent with a pistol in hand, prepared to shoot him on the spot.
To his surprise, Montford stays completely calm when he sees him, and gives him a knowing smile.
"I had a feeling you'd find me, one of these days. You never stop. Neither would I, if somebody had done to me what I did to you. Don't worry, Talbot. I don't blame you for turning that gun on me. An animal can't tame his instincts. I suppose only one of us is leaving this tent alive."
Confused, Talbot demands to know why Montford is accepting his fate so calmly.
"You've got the rage of a wild beast in you, son," Montford says. "So do I. That's why I let you live. Even a wolf can sense a kindred spirit."
Horrified, Talbot flashes back to the night in the forest when the wolf bit him, and he realizes that Montford was the wolf all along. Montford is a werewolf, and he carries the wolf-head cane because he came to terms with his beastly nature long ago, and now accepts it as a part of who he is. That night, he recognized Talbot as the son of the man he killed, and he chose to pass on his lycanthropy to him rather than killing him, believing that he deserved a chance to take his revenge.
As Talbot realizes the truth, Montford changes into his lupine form and prepares to fight him—since he has years of experience in using his abilities, and he no longer needs the power of the full moon to become a werewolf. Talbot futilely tries fight him off with his pistol, but Montford goads him on, telling him to surrender to the wolf's instincts and embrace his true self.
Flashing back to the night that his father was killed, Talbot finally loses control of his anger and feels his animalistic side overtaking his mind. As he becomes a werewolf again, he squares off with Montford in an epic one-on-one battle. He sustains multiple serious injuries in the fight, but ultimately manages to slash his throat with his claws, killing him.
Just at that moment, Talbot's Union comrades finally arrive at the camp after days of chasing the Confederates. When they find Talbot—now a werewolf—standing over Montford's bloodied corpse, they surround him and open fire. Now fully lost to his werewolf instincts, Talbot charges at his old friends, attacking them as ferociously as he attacked the Confederates.
After taking multiple bullet wounds, Talbot is finally forced to flee, but the Union soldiers pursue him through the forests. As word spreads of a wild beast on the loose, Talbot finds himself chased by more soldiers every day, and he's forced to flee into the Appalachian highlands to escape them. After weeks on the run, moving further north with every day, he eventually finds himself in the thick evergreen forests near the Canadian border, where the weather grows bitterly cold. Finally, after going days without food, Talbot reverts to his human form as he collapses in the forest from exhaustion, accepting that he can run no longer.
But as he waits to die, Talbot is approached by a tall figure in a battered leather overcoat, whose face is hidden by a thick hood. The mysterious figure gathers him in his arms and carries him off to a nearby cabin, where he wraps him in animal skins and brings him food.
As soon as Talbot wakes up, we get a good look at his rescuer, and we see that it's none other than Frankenstein's Creature! Forty decades after escaping Prodigium, the Creature is still alive and well, and living a life of seclusion in the Canadian wilderness.
As he regains his strength, Talbot breaks down in tears as he realizes what he did. He's gotten his revenge, but he fears that he's lost his humanity in the process.
"I'm a monster..." he sadly laments.
The Creature puts a comforting hand on his shoulder.
"They called me a monster once, too. But it doesn't matter. Even a monster has a soul, and even the most troubled soul can find redemption. You'll find yours too, even if the journey is longer than you'd like. There are darker things in this world than the empty space in your heart, friend."
Reflecting on all that he's seen and done, Talbot ventures outside the cabin and takes in the unspoiled beauty of the forest, realizing that the woods are now his only home. But as long as he has at least one friend, perhaps they're not such a bad home...
But after the credits roll, we see a mysterious dark-haired man creep through the shadowed pathways of the Carpathian Mountains, making his way towards the rubble of Castle Dracula. As he approaches the ruined castle, a familiar voice speaks to him from the depths of the castle's crypt. It's the voice of Dracula—who's still alive after all these years, and hungry for revenge.
"It's time, Renfield, he says. "The Dark One hungers for sacrifice. But he has other servants than me. Go to Egypt. In the Temple of Set, you'll find the one who will join us. With him on our side, the armies of the dead will be unstoppable!"
Renfield boards a steamship headed for Egypt, and the screen goes dark...
TL;DR: The films are all set in different historical periods, building up to a four-way battle between Dracula, the Wolf Man, the Mummy and Frankenstein's Monster in 1923. The overarching villain is a figure known as "The Dark One" (also known as "Lucifer" and "Set"), who lurks in the background before revealing himself in the finale.
Dracula Untold: In 15th century Transylvania, the warrior prince Matthias Corvinus embarks on a quest to confront his rival Vlad (aka "Dracula") after witnessing a series of vampire attacks, and he discovers that Vlad has pledged his soul to Lucifer in exchange for eternal life. In the finale, Vlad's castle is destroyed by the armies of the Ottoman sultan, temporarily defeating him.
The Mummy Unconquered: During Napoleon Bonaparte's invasion of Egypt in 1798, French soldiers attempt to steal a powerful Egyptian artifact, but accidentally unleash the undead priest Imhotep and his army of mummies, who answer to the god Set. In the finale, Napoleon's army battles Imhotep's undead legions in a massive battle sequence, and one of Napoleon's German commanders is revealed to be Baron von Frankenstein.
Frankenstein Unchained: Baron von Frankenstein's son Victor leaves home to study medicine at the shady Ingolstadt University, where his roommate Igor Waldman invites him to join the clandestine mystic cult "Prodigium". When Victor creates his Creature (aka "Adam"), he discovers that Prodigium actually wants to use him as a living vessel for "The Dark One", who they worship. In the finale, Victor sacrifices himself to save Adam from Igor, and Adam flees Europe in a steamship.
The Wolf Man Untamed: During the American Civil War, Kansan farmboy Lawrence Talbot joins the Union Army in hopes of finding the Confederate soldier who killed his father, but he finds himself bit by a werewolf while stranded in the woods during a battle. He ultimately gets the revenge that he seeks, but nearly loses his mind to his new animal instincts, forcing him to flee into the wilds of Canada to escape his old comrades. In the finale, he is taken in by a mysterious forest-dwelling hermit, who turns out to be Frankenstein's Creature.
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